United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs Sustainable Development
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Institutional Frameworks and international cooperation for Sustainable Development

Description

As far as the 2030 Agenda is concerned, Goal 16 is devoted to the promotion of peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, the provision of access to justice for all and to the establishment of effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. Goal 17 is related to strengthening the means of implementation and revitalization of the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development.

 

The strengthening of the framework to finance sustainable development and the means of implementation for the 2030 Agenda is ensured by the Addis Ababa Action Agenda. The Addis Agenda is the outcome document adopted at the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in July 2015 and endorsed by the General Assembly in its resolution 69/313 of 27 July 2015.

 

With the adoption of “Future We Want”, the outcome document of the Rio +20 conference, held from 20 to 22 June 2012, Member States decided “to establish a universal intergovernmental high-level political forum, building on the strengths, experiences, resources and inclusive participation modalities of the Commission on Sustainable Development, and subsequently replacing the Commission. The high-level political forum shall follow up on the implementation of sustainable development and should avoid overlap with existing structures, bodies and entities in a cost-effective manner.”

 

The High-level Political Forum on sustainable development is today the main United Nations platform on sustainable development. It provides political leadership, guidance and recommendations. It follows up and reviews the implementation of sustainable development commitments and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It addresses new and emerging challenges; promotes the science-policy interface and enhances the integration of economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development.

Displaying 1 - 34 of 34
Title Type Sort descending Date
Additional Resources 6-Dec-2013
Background papers/Special studies 18-Apr-1996
Background papers/Special studies 4-Feb-1998
Background papers/Special studies 31-May-1997
Background papers/Special studies 4-Sep-2002
Background papers/Special studies 18-Apr-1996
General Assembly 11-Dec-2017
General Assembly 12-Dec-2016
Logistics 21-Sep-2007
Meeting reports 26-Mar-2001
Meeting reports 5-May-1994
Meeting reports 4-Apr-1997
Meeting reports 27-Apr-1994
Meeting reports 25-Feb-1997
Meeting reports 18-Apr-1996
Meeting reports 21-Feb-1995
Meeting reports 12-Jul-1994
Other documents 21-Sep-2007
Other documents 3-May-2013
Other documents 20-May-2013
Other documents 16-May-1994
Other documents 21-Sep-2007
Resolutions and decisions 15-Jul-2015
Resolutions and decisions 23-Dec-2015
Secretary-General Reports 10-Feb-1997
Secretary-General Reports 21-Feb-2003
Secretary-General Reports 12-Dec-2000
Secretary-General Reports 21-Jan-2011
Secretary-General Reports 28-Jan-1997
Secretary-General Reports 15-Aug-2013
Secretary-General Reports 27-Feb-1996
Secretary-General Reports 28-Feb-1996
Secretary-General Reports 2-Mar-2001
Secretary-General Reports 1-Mar-1996
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2
Title Category Sort descending Date
Dr. Martin Evans Presentations 9-May-2013
Ms. Kate Offerdahl Statements 9-May-2013

Milestones

  • January 2015 SDG 16
    Goal 16 is devoted to the promotion of peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, the provision of access to justice for all and to the establishment of effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.
  • January 2015 AAAA
    The Addis Ababa Action Agenda established a new global framework for financing sustainable development, aligning all financing flows and policies with economic, social and environmental priorities and defined comprehensive set of policy actions by Member States, with a package of over 100 concrete measures.
  • Institutional framework for sustainable development was one of the two themes of the Rio+20 Conference. The Future We Want emphasized the need for an improved and more effective institutional framework for sustainable development. Within Chapter 4, which is entirely devoted to Institutional Framework for Sustainable Development, Member States committed, inter alia, to strengthen the Economic and Social Council as "a principal organ in the integrated and coordinated follow-up of the outcomes of all major United Nations conferences and summits in the economic, social, environmental and related fields",through paragraph 83. Member States also announced, in paragraph 84, the decision to establish a universal, intergovernmental, high-level political forum and reaffirmed, through paragraph 88,the need to strengthen international environmental governance.
  • January 2012 HLPF
    With the adoption of “Future We Want”,Member States decided, through paragraph 84, “to establish a universal intergovernmental high-level political forum, building on the strengths, experiences, resources and inclusive participation modalities of the Commission on Sustainable Development, and subsequently replacing the Commission. The high-level political forum shall follow up on the implementation of sustainable development and should avoid overlap with existing structures, bodies and entities in a cost-effective manner”. The High-level Political Forum on sustainable development is today the main United Nations platform on sustainable development. It provides political leadership, guidance and recommendations, follows up and reviews the implementation of sustainable development commitments and, as of 2016, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It addresses new and emerging challenges, promotes the science-policy interface and enhances the integration of economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development.
  • January 2005 Kyoto Protocol
    Adopted in 1997, but entered into force only in 2005, the Kyoto Protocol commits industrialized countries to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions based on the principles of the Convention, sets binding emission reduction targets for 37 industrialized countries and the European community in its first commitment period. Overall, these targets add up to an average five per cent emissions reduction compared to 1990 levels over the five-year period 2008 to 2012 (the first commitment period). The Protocol is binding only for developed countries since it identifies them as largely responsible for the current high levels of GHG emissions in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the Protocol places a heavier burden on developed nations under its central principle of the “common but differentiated responsibility”. The Second Commitment Period was inaugurated on 1st January 2013, after the Doha amendment to the Protocol adopted in Doha in December 2012 and will be running until 2020.
  • January 2005 CSD-13
    At its thirteenth session, the Commission reaffirmed its mandate and its role as the high-level commission responsible for sustainable development within the UN system and addressed measures for voluntary monitoring, reporting and assessment at national and regional levels.
  • As expressed in its Article 1, the main goal of the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) is to protect human health and the environment from persistent organic pollutants. In order to achieve this goal, the Convention calls its parties to take measures to eliminate or decrease the release of POPs. The Convention can be considered as the international treaty devoted to the protection of human health from those chemicals remaining intact in the environment for long periods and producing harmful consequences on human health, such as certain cancers, birth defects, dysfunctional immune and reproductive systems, greater susceptibility to disease and damages to the central and peripheral nervous systems or on the environment. The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants was adopted on 22 May 2001 and entered into force on 17 May 2004.
  • January 2003 CSD-11
    CSD-11 adopted the CSD’s multi-year programme work for the period 2004-2017 and decided to organize the upcoming CSD sessions as a series of two-year action-oriented Implementation Cycles, consisting of a Review Session the first year and a Policy Session the second year. Each two-year cycle would consider a selected thematic cluster of issues and a suite of cross-cutting issues.
  • January 2002 JPOI (Chap.10 and 11)
    In respect to legal developments in the area of sustainable development, new and emerging issues were addressed in Chapter 10 of the Plan of Implementation (JPOI) of the WSSD in 2002. In the JPOI, sustainable development is recognized as an overarching goal for institutions at the national, regional and international levels and the Plan also highlights the need to enhance the integration of sustainable development in the activities of all relevant United Nations agencies, programmes and funds, and the international financial institutions, within their mandates. The importance of strengthening the Institutional Framework for Sustainable Development (IFSD) is addressed in Chapter 11. Paragraphs 137-170 propose measures to reinforce institutional arrangements on sustainable development, at all levels, within the framework of Agenda 21, build[ing] on developments since the United Nations conference on Environment and Development and lead[ing] to the achievement of a number of objectives.
  • January 2001 CSD-9 (Decision 9/1)
    The economic, sectoral and cross-sectoral themes considered during CSD-9 were, as determined at UNGASS, the following: energy and transport, atmosphere and energy, and information for decision-making and participation and international cooperation for an enabling environment. From CSD-6 to CSD-9, discussions at each session commenced with multi-stakeholder dialogues, consisting of opening statements from representatives of major groups on selected themes, followed by a dialogue with government representatives.