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United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs Sustainable Development

Early Warning for all; Use case – Early Warnings for African by African young experts

Deltares + HKV (
Partnership
)
#SDGAction50315
    Description
    Description

    The United Nations has initiated new actions to ensure that “Within the next five years, everyone on Earth should be protected by early warning systems against increasingly extreme weather and climate change” (UN Secretary-General António Guterres, 2022). In Africa, even 60 per cent of people lack coverage. We want to contribute to the “Early Warning for all” ambition and accelerate the development of effective multi-hazard early warning systems in Africa.

    Publicly available satellite data and (global) forecasting models, can better support African governments for Early Warning purposes. Once these global datasets are enhanced with local information (e.g. ground observations), local forecasts become reliable and more accurate. This simultaneously increases the understanding of African weather systems and its response to water bodies, given the effect of climate change and increasingly extreme weather change. We will therefor look at:
    • coastal zones;
    • urban areas;
    • large river systems;
    • tropical cyclones.

    We belief that the technical implementation of these locally enhanced global forecasts can best be executed by African national governmental organizations themselves; the meteorological services, hydrological services, marine institutes, and national disaster management organizations. This will enable them to independently maintain and develop these systems further afterwards. The Dutch water sector has extensive knowledge and expertise in international flood forecasting and water management. We, HKV and Deltares, offer to support these institutions with our expertise. We invite other organizations in the whole spectrum of Early Warning, such as meteorological agencies, humanitarian sector, universities, governmental institutions, and NGO’s, to join us by contributing their expertise to this initiative.

    We belief that capacity development works best when focused on young professionals. We want to bring young experts (below the age of 40) from African organizations together to jointly develop early warning systems. This provides them the opportunity to establish an international network and boost their careers. At the same time, we bring in young Dutch experts (below the age of 40) to ensure a bottom-up approach.

    Our aim is that within 5 years most of our African partners can disseminate accurate and reliable Early Warnings in-time, without being dependent on the support of developed countries (like The Netherlands).

    Expected Impact

    This action is new because it proposes a bottom-up approach where young African professionals are the starting point of the initiative. This action adds value because it is focused on the African continent where 60% of the people still lack coverage of Early Warning. We believe this initiative facilitates: Early Warning for All.

    The devastating impacts of natural hazards can be mitigated by structural as well as non-structural measures. The implementation of structural measures generally takes a long time and requires significant financial investments. Non-structural measures, such as Early Warning systems, can be very effective in reducing the impacts and can be implemented much faster. The contribution to water safety can therefore be significant as many people and sectors can benefit from Early Warnings.

    Young professionals in Africa will be at the steering wheel of the initiative and become the corner stone of the African Young Water Professional Network. This will also generate positive impact in their own region increasing skills on leading the process towards Early Warning for all in Africa. This Network is open to other countries, so once it becomes successful, other countries and institutes are invited to participate in the activities and benefit from the experiences gained. The initial focus is on coastal floods and flash floods using openly available and easily accessible data and information. Later, this can be expanded to riverine flooding, cyclones, droughts or other types of natural hazards.

    This action contributes to the following SDG:
    • SDG 6: Clean water and sanitation, since early warning does increase resilience of vital infrastructure
    • SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities, since early warning does increase resilience and climate adaptation in urban areas.
    • SDG 13: Climate action, with climate change extreme events become more frequent and more severe, early warning is an effective way of risk reduction.

    We will build on existing networks for cooperation between national organizations, for example through WMO networks. This way, we ensure alignment with other ongoing programs.

    Partners

    • African young experts (<40 years) working for national governmental institutions with the mandate of flood risk mitigation, such as meteorological services, hydrological services, marine institutes, national disaster management institutes.
    • Dutch young experts from HKV, Deltares, and other parties working in the whole spectrum of early warning such as meteorological agencies, humanitarian sector, universities, governmental institutions and NGO’s.

    Additional information

    Goal 6

    Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

    Goal 6

    6.1

    By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all

    6.1.1

    Proportion of population using safely managed drinking water services

    6.2

    By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations

    6.2.1

    Proportion of population using (a) safely managed sanitation services and (b) a hand-washing facility with soap and water

    6.3

    By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally

    6.3.1

    Proportion of domestic and industrial wastewater flows safely treated

    6.3.2

    Proportion of bodies of water with good ambient water quality

    6.4

    By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity
    6.4.1

    Change in water-use efficiency over time

    6.4.2

    Level of water stress: freshwater withdrawal as a proportion of available freshwater resources

    6.5

    By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate

    6.5.1

    Degree of integrated water resources management 

    6.5.2

    Proportion of transboundary basin area with an operational arrangement for water cooperation

    6.6

    By 2020, protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes
    6.6.1

    Change in the extent of water-related ecosystems over time

    6.a

    By 2030, expand international cooperation and capacity-building support to developing countries in water- and sanitation-related activities and programmes, including water harvesting, desalination, water efficiency, wastewater treatment, recycling and reuse technologies
    6.a.1

    Amount of water- and sanitation-related official development assistance that is part of a government-coordinated spending plan

    6.b

    Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management

    6.b.1

    Proportion of local administrative units with established and operational policies and procedures for participation of local communities in water and sanitation management

    Goal 11

    Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

    Goal 11

    11.1

    By 2030, ensure access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade slums

    11.1.1

    Proportion of urban population living in slums, informal settlements or inadequate housing

    11.2

    By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons
    11.2.1

    Proportion of population that has convenient access to public transport, by sex, age and persons with disabilities

    11.3

    By 2030, enhance inclusive and sustainable urbanization and capacity for participatory, integrated and sustainable human settlement planning and management in all countries
    11.3.1

    Ratio of land consumption rate to population growth rate

    11.3.2

    Proportion of cities with a direct participation structure of civil society in urban planning and management that operate regularly and democratically

    11.4

    Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage

    11.4.1

    Total per capita expenditure on the preservation, protection and conservation of all cultural and natural heritage, by source of funding (public, private), type of heritage (cultural, natural) and level of government (national, regional, and local/municipal)

    11.5

    By 2030, significantly reduce the number of deaths and the number of people affected and substantially decrease the direct economic losses relative to global gross domestic product caused by disasters, including water-related disasters, with a focus on protecting the poor and people in vulnerable situations

    11.5.1

    Number of deaths, missing persons and directly affected persons attributed to disasters per 100,000 population

    11.5.2

    Direct economic loss attributed to disasters in relation to global domestic product (GDP)

    11.5.3

    (a) Damage to critical infrastructure and (b) number of disruptions to basic services, attributed to disasters

    11.6

    By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management

    11.6.1

    Proportion of municipal solid waste collected and managed in controlled facilities out of total municipal waste generated, by cities

    11.6.2

    Annual mean levels of fine particulate matter (e.g. PM2.5 and PM10) in cities (population weighted)

    11.7

    By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities
    11.7.1

    Average share of the built-up area of cities that is open space for public use for all, by sex, age and persons with disabilities

    11.7.2

    Proportion of persons victim of physical or sexual harassment, by sex, age, disability status and place of occurrence, in the previous 12 months

    11.a

    Support positive economic, social and environmental links between urban, peri-urban and rural areas by strengthening national and regional development planning

    11.a.1

    Number of countries that have national urban policies or regional development plans that (a) respond to population dynamics; (b) ensure balanced territorial development; and (c) increase local fiscal space

    11.b

    By 2020, substantially increase the number of cities and human settlements adopting and implementing integrated policies and plans towards inclusion, resource efficiency, mitigation and adaptation to climate change, resilience to disasters, and develop and implement, in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, holistic disaster risk management at all levels

    11.b.1

    Number of countries that adopt and implement national disaster risk reduction strategies in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030

    11.b.2

    Proportion of local governments that adopt and implement local disaster risk reduction strategies in line with national disaster risk reduction strategies

    11.c

    Support least developed countries, including through financial and technical assistance, in building sustainable and resilient buildings utilizing local materials

    Goal 13

    Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

    Goal 13

    13.1

    Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

    13.1.1

    Number of deaths, missing persons and directly affected persons attributed to disasters per 100,000 population

    13.1.2

    Number of countries that adopt and implement national disaster risk reduction strategies in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030

    13.1.3

    Proportion of local governments that adopt and implement local disaster risk reduction strategies in line with national disaster risk reduction strategies

    13.2

    Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

    13.2.1

    Number of countries with nationally determined contributions, long-term strategies, national adaptation plans and adaptation communications, as reported to the secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    13.2.2

    Total greenhouse gas emissions per year

    13.3

    Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

    13.3.1

    Extent to which (i) global citizenship education and (ii) education for sustainable development are mainstreamed in (a) national education policies; (b) curricula; (c) teacher education; and (d) student assessment

    13.a

    Implement the commitment undertaken by developed-country parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to a goal of mobilizing jointly $100 billion annually by 2020 from all sources to address the needs of developing countries in the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation and fully operationalize the Green Climate Fund through its capitalization as soon as possible

    13.a.1

    Amounts provided and mobilized in United States dollars per year in relation to the continued existing collective mobilization goal of the $100 billion commitment through to 2025

    13.b

    Promote mechanisms for raising capacity for effective climate change-related planning and management in least developed countries and small island developing States, including focusing on women, youth and local and marginalized communities


     

    13.b.1

    Number of least developed countries and small island developing States with nationally determined contributions, long-term strategies, national adaptation plans and adaptation communications, as reported to the secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    Operational early warning for Africa openly accessible for all
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    Timeline
    28 February 2023 (start date)
    28 February 2028 (date of completion)
    Entity
    Deltares + HKV
    SDGs
    Region
    1. Africa
    Other beneficiaries

    1. Direct beneficiaries: All national hydromet agencies and national Red Crosses
    2. Indirect beneficiaries: third parties which may benefit from improved early warnings and early action protocols.

    Website/More information
    N/A
    Countries
    Algeria
    Algeria
    Angola
    Angola
    Benin
    Benin
    Botswana
    Botswana
    Burkina Faso
    Burkina Faso
    Burundi
    Burundi
    Cabo Verde
    Cabo Verde
    Cameroon
    Cameroon
    Central African Republic
    Central African Republic
    Chad
    Chad
    Comoros
    Comoros
    Côte d'Ivoire
    Côte d'Ivoire
    Democratic Republic of the Congo
    Democratic Republic of the Congo
    Djibouti
    Djibouti
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Equatorial Guinea
    Equatorial Guinea
    Eritrea
    Eritrea
    Ethiopia
    Ethiopia
    Gabon
    Gabon
    CAPRE Foundation
    Ghana
    Ghana
    Guinea
    Guinea
    Guinea-Bissau
    Guinea-Bissau
    Kenya
    Kenya
    Lesotho
    Lesotho
    Liberia
    Liberia
    Libya
    Libya
    Madagascar
    Madagascar
    Malawi
    Malawi
    Mali
    Mali
    Mauritania
    Mauritania
    Mauritius
    Mauritius
    Morocco
    Morocco
    Mozambique
    Mozambique
    Namibia
    Namibia
    Netherlands
    Netherlands
    Niger
    Niger
    Nigeria
    Nigeria
    Service Centre for Development Cooperation
    Rwanda
    Rwanda
    Sao Tomé and Principe
    Sao Tomé and Principe
    Senegal
    Senegal
    Seychelles
    Seychelles
    Sierra Leone
    Sierra Leone
    Somalia
    Somalia
    South Africa
    South Africa
    South Sudan
    South Sudan
    Sudan
    Sudan
    Global Action Plan
    Togo
    Togo
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    Uganda
    Uganda
    Zambia
    Zambia
    Zimbabwe
    Zimbabwe
    Contact Information

    Toon, Director marine and coastal systems at Deltares