United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs Sustainable Development

Promoting Ocean Education: Ocean Bachelor - meet the Ocean now!

Universidade NOVA de Lisboa (
Academic institution
)
#OceanAction46768
    Description
    Description

    The full implementation of the 2030 Agenda represents a major challenge for the entire international community in the current decade. Such challenge asks for concrete and immediate action. With that in mind, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, a Portuguese University, is launching the Ocean Bachelor, a pioneer multidisciplinary high education degree dedicated to the Ocean. Supporting the implementation of the UN SDGs, especially SDG 4 (Quality Education) and 14 (Life Bellow Water), this degree has sustainability as a common background and is based on five pillars that intersect in various areas: Law; Economy and Management; Biology, Engineering and Technology; History, Geopolitics and Culture; Information and Data Systems. The intersection between these areas will provide a fertile environment to identify and create opportunities and solutions and to overcome obstacles trough a wide, holistic approach of the Ocean. The Ocean Bachelor has the ambition of making that bridge, through an overall understanding of the opportunities and threats, facing the sea at a global level and an entrepreneurial and differentiating positioning at a local level, always taking sustainability into consideration. This degree, which will be a three-year course to be lectured in English, aims to provide its students with multidisciplinary knowledge in order to capacitate them to work in any sector of the blue economy and to develop research on matters related to the ocean. To promote engagement with other organisations the Ocean Bachelor is built around a strong connection with other Portuguese and international entities. The Ocean Bachelor engages the participation of seven different faculties of two different Portuguese universities, namely, NOVA School of Law, NOVA School of Business and Economics, NOVA School of Science and Technology, School of Social and Human Sciences, and NOVA Information Management School, from Universidade NOVA de Lisboa; and School of Science and Technology and School of Economics from Universidade do Algarve. The launch of the Ocean Bachelor announces these partnering institutions’ commitment to the development of the Ocean education, which is essential to guarantee the implementation of the UN 2030 Agenda, particularly, the SGD 4 and 14. Given the fact that it is a multidisciplinary course, it will teach and address various issues related to the Ocean, such as marine litter, ocean policies and governance, maritime security, and many others. In this sense, the main goal of this commitment is to further develop and incentivize Ocean education and knowledge through the capacitation of (future) workers and researchers in this field. To achieve this goal, the course adopted different methods. Beyond the classroom learning, it has partnered with specialised public and private entities, and Portuguese foundations that work specifically with ocean matters in order to engage with in practice roles that allows them to be more sensible to the challenges ahead.

    Partners

    - Universidade NOVA de Lisboa (academic institution): o NOVA School of Law (academic institution); o NOVA School of Business and Economics (academic institution); o NOVA School of Science and Technology (academic institution); o School of Social and Human Sciences (academic institution); and o NOVA Information Management School (academic institution). - Universidade do Algarve (academic institution): o School of Science and Technology (academic institution); and o School of Economics (academic institution).

    Goal 4

    Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

    Goal 4

    4.1

    By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes

    4.1.1

    Proportion of children and young people (a) in grades 2/3; (b) at the end of primary; and (c) at the end of lower secondary achieving at least a minimum proficiency level in (i) reading and (ii) mathematics, by sex

    4.1.2

    Completion rate (primary education, lower secondary education, upper secondary education)

    4.2

    By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and pre-primary education so that they are ready for primary education

    4.2.1

    Proportion of children aged 24–59 months who are developmentally on track in health, learning and psychosocial well-being, by sex

    4.2.2

    Participation rate in organized learning (one year before the official primary entry age), by sex

    4.3

    By 2030, ensure equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university

    4.3.1

    Participation rate of youth and adults in formal and non-formal education and training in the previous 12 months, by sex

    4.4

    By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship

    4.4.1

    Proportion of youth and adults with information and communications technology (ICT) skills, by type of skill

    4.5

    By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations
    4.5.1

    Parity indices (female/male, rural/urban, bottom/top wealth quintile and others such as disability status, indigenous peoples and conflict-affected, as data become available) for all education indicators on this list that can be disaggregated

    4.6

    By 2030, ensure that all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, both men and women, achieve literacy and numeracy

    4.6.1

    Proportion of population in a given age group achieving at least a fixed level of proficiency in functional (a) literacy and (b) numeracy skills, by sex

    4.7

    By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development

    4.7.1

    Extent to which (i) global citizenship education and (ii) education for sustainable development are mainstreamed in (a) national education policies; (b) curricula; (c) teacher education and (d) student assessment

    4.a

    Build and upgrade education facilities that are child, disability and gender sensitive and provide safe, non-violent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all

    4.a.1

    Proportion of schools offering basic services, by type of service

    4.b

    By 2020, substantially expand globally the number of scholarships available to developing countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing States and African countries, for enrolment in higher education, including vocational training and information and communications technology, technical, engineering and scientific programmes, in developed countries and other developing countries
    4.b.1

    Volume of official development assistance flows for scholarships by sector and type of study

    4.c

    By 2030, substantially increase the supply of qualified teachers, including through international cooperation for teacher training in developing countries, especially least developed countries and small island developing States

    4.c.1

    Proportion of teachers with the minimum required qualifications, by education level

    Goal 13

    Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

    Goal 13

    13.1

    Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

    13.1.1

    Number of deaths, missing persons and directly affected persons attributed to disasters per 100,000 population

    13.1.2

    Number of countries that adopt and implement national disaster risk reduction strategies in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030

    13.1.3

    Proportion of local governments that adopt and implement local disaster risk reduction strategies in line with national disaster risk reduction strategies

    13.2

    Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

    13.2.1

    Number of countries with nationally determined contributions, long-term strategies, national adaptation plans and adaptation communications, as reported to the secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    13.2.2

    Total greenhouse gas emissions per year

    13.3

    Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

    13.3.1

    Extent to which (i) global citizenship education and (ii) education for sustainable development are mainstreamed in (a) national education policies; (b) curricula; (c) teacher education; and (d) student assessment

    13.a

    Implement the commitment undertaken by developed-country parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to a goal of mobilizing jointly $100 billion annually by 2020 from all sources to address the needs of developing countries in the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation and fully operationalize the Green Climate Fund through its capitalization as soon as possible

    13.a.1

    Amounts provided and mobilized in United States dollars per year in relation to the continued existing collective mobilization goal of the $100 billion commitment through to 2025

    13.b

    Promote mechanisms for raising capacity for effective climate change-related planning and management in least developed countries and small island developing States, including focusing on women, youth and local and marginalized communities


     

    13.b.1

    Number of least developed countries and small island developing States with nationally determined contributions, long-term strategies, national adaptation plans and adaptation communications, as reported to the secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    Goal 14

    Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

    Goal 14

    14.1

    By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution

    14.1.1

    (a) Index of coastal eutrophication; and (b) plastic debris density

    14.2

    By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

    14.2.1

    Number of countries using ecosystem-based approaches to managing marine areas

    14.3

    Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels

    14.3.1
    Average marine acidity (pH) measured at agreed suite of representative sampling stations

    14.4

    By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans, in order to restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible, at least to levels that can produce maximum sustainable yield as determined by their biological characteristics

    14.4.1
    Proportion of fish stocks within biologically sustainable levels

    14.5

    By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information

    14.5.1
    Coverage of protected areas in relation to marine areas

    14.6

    By 2020, prohibit certain forms of fisheries subsidies which contribute to overcapacity and overfishing, eliminate subsidies that contribute to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and refrain from introducing new such subsidies, recognizing that appropriate and effective special and differential treatment for developing and least developed countries should be an integral part of the World Trade Organization fisheries subsidies negotiation

    14.6.1

    Degree of implementation of international instruments aiming to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing

    14.7

    By 2030, increase the economic benefits to Small Island developing States and least developed countries from the sustainable use of marine resources, including through sustainable management of fisheries, aquaculture and tourism

    14.7.1

    Sustainable fisheries as a proportion of GDP in small island developing States, least developed countries and all countries

    14.a

    Increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology, taking into account the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology, in order to improve ocean health and to enhance the contribution of marine biodiversity to the development of developing countries, in particular small island developing States and least developed countries

    14.a.1
    Proportion of total research budget allocated to research in the field of marine technology

    14.b

    Provide access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets

    14.b.1

    Degree of application of a legal/regulatory/policy/institutional framework which recognizes and protects access rights for small‐scale fisheries

    14.c

    Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of "The future we want"

    14.c.1

    Number of countries making progress in ratifying, accepting and implementing through legal, policy and institutional frameworks, ocean-related instruments that implement international law, as reflected in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, for the conservation and sustainable use of the oceans and their resources

    Name Description
    14.1 <p>By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution</p>
    14.2 <p>By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans</p>
    14.3 <p>Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels</p>
    14.a <p>Increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology, taking into account the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology, in order to improve ocean health and to enhance the contribution of marine biodiversity to the development of developing countries, in particular small island developing States and least developed countries</p>
    14.c <p>Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of "The future we want"</p>

    First generation of graduates with a multidisciplinary degree focused on the Ocean with the necessary skills to fill the gap in the blue industry and/or academia.

    Financing (in USD)
    The financing is required to provide students with scholarships and the opportunity to go abroad for exchange experiences with other academic institutions, professional internships and/or experiences in international organisations;
    Staff / Technical expertise
    The Staff/ Technical Expertise is required to engage with the students through special events, lectures, sessions, conferences and networking through a more practical approach and knowledge of the Ocean.
    No progress reports have been submitted. Please sign in and click here to submit one.
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    Timeline
    15 September 2024 (start date)
    15 September 2032 (date of completion)
    Entity
    Universidade NOVA de Lisboa
    SDGs
    Other beneficiaries

    In addition to promoting Ocean education and qualifying young people in the various Ocean related issues, the academia, civil society, national and international, private and public sectors and organisations can benefit from the qualified employees that will enter the blue economy.

    Ocean Basins
    Global
    Communities of Ocean Action
    Mangroves, Coral reefs, Ocean acidification, Marine and coastal ecosystems management, Sustainable fisheries, Marine pollution, Sustainable blue economy, Scientific knowledge, research capacity development and transfer of marine technology, Implementation of international law as reflected in United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea
    More information
    Countries
    Portugal
    Portugal
    Headquarters
    Lisbon, Portugal
    Contact Information

    Assunção, Professor