United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs Sustainable Development

Sustainable safe drinking water supply for rural areas as a point-like technology giving instant solution for the water-challenges with an investment value of less than €13-15 per capita and less than €3 per capita supply cost

Puraset Water and Metal Solutions Ltd. (
Private sector
)
#SDGAction49388
    Description
    Description
    Access to Drinkable water in rural and non-permanent urban supply systems in developing countries, especially in rural areas, but also in general, the supply of drinking water to the population and the condition of existing pipelines is extremely low. Drinking water supply in these areas is provided from partially undrinkable water sources and with or without partially and intermittently operating pipeline networks. Most water treatment systems require capital-intensive facilities, long years of construction with extensive distribution infrastructure and a labour force to operate it. This makes it challenging to deploy in rural areas, thereby limiting access to safe drinking water for many communities. PurAID® technology as a point-like solution where no pipeline construction is needed gives fast answer for the water challenges with an investment value of less than €13-15 per capita instead of the €500-2,000 per capita value need in the developed world (with pipeline included). PurAID® means a sustainable and affordable solution through high-quality, modern regenerable filter technology and via the packaging-free drinking water supply. PurAID® is a uniform technology that can be easily designed and installed into an existing cleaning line or as a new purification plant, there is no additional pipeline construction needed, which also means moderated investment need. PurAID® water supply for rural communities entitled to secure with short installation time the continuous safe water source for locals. One piece of PurAID® container plant can serve 2,000 – 3,000 people with healthy drinking water daily. It has the advantage of being able to produce potable water either as an end-of-pipe installation or by connecting to surface or groundwater. Protecting the environment and providing everyday healthy drinking water for people is not just about building innovative technologies. The long-term successful operation of facilities developed and implemented entirely on a tailor-made, local basis requires the training of local professionals and the education of the population, with special attention to the youngest generation. Preserving clean water sources and groundwater resources depends not only on building a modern infrastructure but also on education and awareness raising. Our model is not only about the innovative product we provide but also about involving the future generation by educating them on the value of water.
    Expected Impact
    International scientific literature and research results demonstrate a deep and wide gap in the costs and values related to water. Facilities related to water and sewerage networks providing urban water utility services are more expensive than any other public service infrastructure. The smaller the unit of supply, the size of the settlement, and the higher the per capita infrastructure and service costs are. The statement is based on a national water utility asset valuation (generated by settlement, at object-level, based on replacement values) which shows not only the substantial differences in the per capita investment costs but also the relation of the treatment facilities and the distribution/collection networks. The average per capita replacement costs of all water and wastewater infrastructure per municipality group are about five times higher in municipalities with less than 100 inhabitants, and twice as high in municipalities with 1,000 to 2,000 inhabitants than in municipalities with more than 100,000 inhabitants. It is further complicated by the fact that in developing countries, especially in rural areas, but also in general, the supply of drinking water to the population and the condition of existing pipelines is extremely low. Drinking water supply in these areas is provided from partially undrinkable water sources and with or without partially and intermittently operating pipeline networks. Most water treatment systems require capital-intensive facilities, long years of construction with extensive distribution infrastructure and a labour force to operate it. This makes it challenging to deploy in rural areas, thereby limiting access to safe drinking water for many communities. PurAID® technology as a point-like solution where no pipeline construction is needed gives fast answer for the water challenges with an investment value of less than €13-15 per capita instead of the €500-2,000 per capita value need in the developed world (with pipeline included). End of pipe-related systems mean sustainable and affordable solutions through the high quality and packaging-free drinking water that can be provided for the population with this technology in the areas concerned and for less than €3/person/year
    Partners

    Hungarian Water Partnership, Hungarian Water Association, Pureco Africa Ltd., Ghanaian Community Water and Sanitation Agency Countries: Ghana (Further extension possibilities: Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Rwanda, Egypt, Azerbaijan)

    Additional information
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2C_1eeJBqcA&t=8s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2EdILrskjRo&t=23s

    Goal 6

    Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

    Goal 6

    6.1

    By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all

    6.1.1

    Proportion of population using safely managed drinking water services

    6.2

    By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations

    6.2.1

    Proportion of population using (a) safely managed sanitation services and (b) a hand-washing facility with soap and water

    6.3

    By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally

    6.3.1

    Proportion of domestic and industrial wastewater flows safely treated

    6.3.2

    Proportion of bodies of water with good ambient water quality

    6.4

    By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity
    6.4.1

    Change in water-use efficiency over time

    6.4.2

    Level of water stress: freshwater withdrawal as a proportion of available freshwater resources

    6.5

    By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate

    6.5.1

    Degree of integrated water resources management 

    6.5.2

    Proportion of transboundary basin area with an operational arrangement for water cooperation

    6.6

    By 2020, protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes
    6.6.1

    Change in the extent of water-related ecosystems over time

    6.a

    By 2030, expand international cooperation and capacity-building support to developing countries in water- and sanitation-related activities and programmes, including water harvesting, desalination, water efficiency, wastewater treatment, recycling and reuse technologies
    6.a.1

    Amount of water- and sanitation-related official development assistance that is part of a government-coordinated spending plan

    6.b

    Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management

    6.b.1

    Proportion of local administrative units with established and operational policies and procedures for participation of local communities in water and sanitation management

    Name Description
    Successful PurAID® project in Ghana. The PurAID® with a daily capacity of 10 m3 is used to remove iron and manganese contaminants as well as disease-causing bacteria from the water of the public wells in the town of 12,000 inhabitants
    PurAID® modular, mobile, pallet-based water purification unit, one unit can serve 2,000 – 3,000 people with healthy drinking water daily.
    Financing (in USD)
    Private founding, we are approaching stakeholders, authorities to see the opportunities in our economical and sustainable model to step in as a donor.
    Financing (in USD)
    Drinking water can be provided to the population with a minimum investment cost and with a return on investment, and therefore may also be of interest to private investors.
    Other, please specify
    We hope to reach the awareness of international organizations committed in sustainable and safe water supply for the citizens of the world with the model can make water supply sustainable within short time.
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    False
    Action Network
    SDG Acceleration Actions
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    Timeline
    01 January 2021 (start date)
    31 December 2024 (date of completion)
    Entity
    Puraset Water and Metal Solutions Ltd.
    SDGs
    Region
    1. Africa
    2. Asia and Pacific
    Other beneficiaries

    local (rural) communities, schools, health centres

    More information
    Countries
    Azerbaijan
    Azerbaijan
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Ghana
    Ghana
    Rwanda
    Rwanda
    Sierra Leone
    Sierra Leone
    Global Action Plan
    Contact Information

    Csilla, managing director