United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs Sustainable Development

Suggested new language marked in green I INTRODUCTION AND PROPOSED GOALS AND TARGETS ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE POST2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA We reaffirm that we continue to be guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nati

Suggested new language marked in green I

INTRODUCTION AND PROPOSED GOALS AND TARGETS ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE POST2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA
We reaffirm that we continue to be guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, with full respect for international law and its principles. We further reaffirm the importance of freedom, peace and security, respect for all human rights, including the right to development and the right to an adequate standard of living, including the right to food, the human right to water and sanitation, the rule of law, good governance, gender equality, women’s empowerment and the overall commitment to just and democratic societies for development.
Proposed goal 6. Secure Ensure the human right to water and sanitation for all for a sustainable world

6.1 by 2030 2020, ensure the human right to water and sanitation by providing universal access to safe, sufficient affordable, acceptable and accessible drinking potable water, adequate sanitation and hygiene for all, while progressively eliminating inequalities

6.2 by 2030 2020 provide universal access to sufficient, safe, affordable, and acceptable sanitation and hygiene including at home, schools, workplaces, health centers and refugee camps, paying special attention to the needs of marginalized groups including women and girls.

Rationale:

In line with the proposal from Bolivia, Argentina and Ecuador as well as Spain, Italy and Turkey, we call for the human right to water and sanitation to be recognized explicitly within SDG 6. Universality is insufficient and we are not satisfied with the approach of mainstreaming. The human right to water and sanitation must be explicitly recognized in order to ensure that vulnerable and marginalized groups are targeted and that inequalities are addressed. The Human Right to Water and Sanitation was recognized by the UNGA. We would consider it a major setback for the OWG to settle for less within the SDG agenda. A letter was sent by 300 NGOs making this appeal to the OWG.


6.3 by 2030, improve water quality by significantly reducing pollution, eliminating dumping of toxic materials, and improving wastewater management by x%, recycling and reuse by y%

6.4 by 2030, improve water-use efficiency watersheds protection by x% across all sectors through a hierarchy of water use that prioritizes basic human needs, local consumption, and healthy ecosystems

6.5 implement integrated people-centered democratic, participatory and accountable water resources management, including appropriate and transparent trans-boundary co-operation

6.6 ensure sustainable extraction and supply of fresh water, and by 2020 protect and restore ecosystems and aquifers that provide water-related services
By 2020, set a zero target on fresh water extraction beyond sustainable supply and protect and restore ecosystems and aquifers

Rationale:

To focus on efficiency alone does not enable governments to look at how water resources are allocated. Before we apply strategies to improve efficiency of water use, we need to ensure that scarce supplies are safeguarded for basic needs and ecosystems. There must be strong regulation to prevent over-extraction.


6.7 by 2030 decrease by x% mortality, disease, and decrease by y% economic losses caused by natural and human-induced water-related disasters, contamination, and scarcity

6.8 provide adequate publicly financed and operated facilities and infrastructure, both built and natural, for safe drinking water and sanitation systems, for productive equitable and sustainable uses of water resources and for mitigating the impacts of water-related disasters and health risks

Rationale:

Strong publicly financed and publicly operated water and sanitation services are required to reach the most vulnerable segments of the population and to ensure democratic control of these essential services.

New Target
6.9 By 2020, significantly reduce inequality in access to water supplies through hierarchy of water use that prioritizes vulnerable populations and fragile ecosystems over large-scale commercial uses.



In addition, we propose the following means of implementation:

-Ensure public financing for universal access to public water and sanitation services

- Protect water and sanitation services from liberalization through loan conditionalities, trade agreements and investment treaties

- Recognize indigenous and community rights to empower frontline communities in the protection of watersheds

- Enable international and regional cooperation in knowledge and technology transfer through public-public partnerships