United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs Sustainable Development

Pacific Small Island Developing States (PSIDS)

Cook Islands, Federated State of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu,
Vanuatu
PACIFIC SMALL ISLAND DEVELOPING STATES
United Nations Member States
Phone: 212-557-5001
Fax: 212-557-5009
E-mail: pngmission@pngun.org
Permanent Mission of the Independent State of
Papua New Guinea to the United Nations
201 East 42nd Street, Suite 2411, New York, N.Y. 10017
Statement
on Means of Implementation
at the 6th Session of the Open Working Group (OWG) on
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
by
H.E. Mr Robert G. Aisi
Permanent Representative
of the Independent State of Papua New Guinea to the United Nations and Chair of Pacific Small Island Developing States (PSIDS) at the UN
on behalf of the Pacific Troika in the OWG on SDGs and PSIDS
9 December 2013, New York
“Check against delivery”
Co-Chair,
I speak on behalf of the Pacific Troika members of the OWG on SDGs; namely, Nauru, Palau and my own country – Papua New Guinea – as well as representing the 9 other Pacific Small Island Developing States; including the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Republic of Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.
With the exception of the PSIDS members who are not G77 members; we align ourselves with the statement made by Fiji on behalf of G77 and China. We however, all associate ourselves with AOSIS Chair, Nauru’s statement that will be delivered later.
We acknowledge with gratitude the Technical Support Team’s continuing useful efforts in providing insightful background documents to guide our discussions. We also thank Mr Erik Solheim of OECD, Professor Rolf-Dieter Heur of CERN, Mr Martin Khor of South-South Centre for their respective briefings and look forward to the other speakers presentations later today on the means of implementation for sustainable development goals.
Cook Islands, Federated State of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu,
Vanuatu
2
Co-Chair,
This intervention will be confined only to the issue regarding the “means of implementation”, which, for us, is a key driver for our development agenda.
For PSIDS, the principal “means of implementation” from all levels and sectors we require for our sustainable development include enhanced and transformative partnership; mobilizing and providing adequate financial resources to those who need it the most, particularly developing countries; ensuring legal and appropriate and affordable technology transfers that support sustainable energy, improved health and green-growth; supporting human resources training and institutional capacity building; a fair and equitable global trading system; and marshalling long-term political will and commitment to provide right policy direction, legislative and governance frameworks and a stable, secure and conducive environment underpinned by States taking primary responsibility to implement the development agenda and complemented by other stakeholders.
Co-Chair,
We would underscore that achieving national development plans and internationally agreed development goals, including any future sustainable development goals, are doomed to fail if the means of implementation that are necessary to achieve them are absent, inadequate or not provided in a timely manner. This is a key enabler and a fundamental pillar for any development strategy, plan or vision to succeed.
The challenges to galvanize and provide the necessary means of implementation to transform the post-2015 development agenda aspirations into reality, in our view, will continue to remain an ominous challenge for all but especially for developing countries, including SIDS.
The global community therefore must build on lessons learnt from the existing internationally agreed development goals including MDGs and our respective national development plans, including working in close partnership individually and collectively to transform lives and livelihoods of our peoples and communities that will bring about inclusive and sustainable development that leaves no-one-behind.
This also requires a paradigm shift to a more socially inclusive, broad-based economic growth, complemented by upscaled resource mobilization, and coherent and enhanced coordination by all stakeholders at all levels for the post-2015 development agenda.
Cook Islands, Federated State of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu,
Vanuatu
3
Co-Chair,
In preparation for our participation at the September 2014 Third SIDS International Conference in Samoa, SIDS clearly recognize that our national and collective efforts for sustainable development under the auspices of the internationally agreed development goals including the MDGs, Agenda 21 and especially the Barbados Plan of Action and the Mauritius Strategy of Implementation, over the last two decades have been hindered in large part by insufficient means of implementation at the national level compounded by inadequate international support and the lack of coherent and integrated approach.
We are however, committed to work in partnership with all stakeholders and at all levels and therefore call for a transformational shift if we are to avoid the pitfalls of the past.
The international community must upscale Millennium Development Goal 8 on Partnership in the post-2015 development agenda. The partnership should be genuine and durable and based on mutual trust, equality, respect and accountability as has been advocated by SIDS in the theme for the 2014 SIDS Third International Conference in Samoa.
For PSIDS, these ought to be anchored in national ownership and require political will delivered through long-term and predictable commitments. Partnerships in all their forms should be utilized, enhanced and strengthened to ensure meaningful engagement and achieve the vision of self-reliance and deliver quality outcomes for our peoples and nations.
Co-Chair,
International partnership and cooperation is especially critical for us in the restoration of a healthy, resilient and productive ocean, which is our primary nutrition, food security and economic source. Areas requiring specific attention includes adequate technical, technological, scientific, and financial support to assess, conserve and sustainably manage marine resources, implement regimes to effectively monitor and control fishing vessels to combat Illegal, Unregulated Unreported fishing, and for improving and monitoring and observation on ocean acidification, information sharing and resource mobilization, capacity and institutional strengthening to improve ocean resources and ecosystem management and foster environmental advocacy efforts.
In this regard, we invite OWG members and other UN Member States as well as well as other stakeholders to the PSIDS Side Event on Oceans and Seas on 11 December 2013 at NLB Conference room E from 1.15 to 2.30 pm.
Cook Islands, Federated State of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu,
Vanuatu
4
Co-Chair,
Development partners are equally accountable both on their past commitments for sustainable development financing under the Monterey Consensus, which still remains to be fulfilled as well as on future ones.
We note with concern that the International financial mechanisms have failed to fully recognize and account for SIDS vulnerabilities. As a result, SIDS have not been able to access the financing for development that they need. We also remain concerned with the declining ODA from development partners.
Whilst we appreciate the challenges faced by donor partners in meeting their ODA commitments to developing countries in the present difficult economic and financial environment, we however, urge for enhanced oversight on the Global Monitoring Process for the Busan Global Partnership for effective Development Cooperation with focus on ownership, accountability and transparency.
Co-Chair,
We consider timely reviews and reforms of intergovernmental processes at the global level and domestically a necessity and an important mechanism that can ensure a more streamlined, coherent, effective and successful implementation of sustainable development agenda.
We therefore welcome the reform of the Commission on Sustainable Development and its replacement by the High Level Political Forum as an important step in the right direction to effectively address key outstanding issues including weaknesses in the means of implementation of SIDS development agenda.
We also support the ongoing work of the Intergovernmental Committee of Experts on Sustainable Development Financing and look forward to its conclusions and recommendations as well as their implementation.
Co-Chair,
An important element of implementation for us is the call on the international community to shift away from capacity building to institutional strengthening as an important component of international support for our sustainable development. Institution building along with structural reforms in our view encourages the use of country systems and promotes the retention of knowledge in all its forms, including traditional knowledge, within a country.
Cook Islands, Federated State of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu,
Vanuatu
5
We also urge for domestic and mutual accountability and risk sharing among SIDS, partners and implementing agencies and all stakeholders in the development process so as to ensure the effective and efficient use of resources.
This should be reflected in all partnerships, as well as in the priorities and work programmes of all UN agencies providing assistance to us. Such a transformative paradigm shift is necessary to address gaps in monitoring and evaluation, and ensure implementation and delivery of results on the ground.
Co-Chair,
Ensuring adequate and sustainable means of implementation for the post-2015 development agenda for Pacific SIDS not only strategically means enabling us to taking full ownership of our sustainable development, eradicating poverty and safeguarding our natural environment but fundamentally, this will assist us build resilience to our vulnerabilities and challenges. By doing so, guarantee our sovereignty and survival as a people and nations.
It also promotes national ownership and serves as a bridge linking our national sustainable development priorities and an accelerator for achieving the internationally agreed development goals including MDGs and future sustainable development agenda.
Another important challenge that continues to constrain PSIDS integrated and coherent sustainable development is the inadequacy of accurate and credible data for measuring and monitoring inclusive and sustainable development. It is imperative that the international community assist SIDS in strengthening their national statistical and information systems, including data collection and management; their analytical capabilities for decision-making; and their monitoring and evaluation systems for sustainable development.
Co-Chair,
We remain seriously concerned with the increasing impact of climate change and slow-onset activities on our people’s lives, environment, including oceans acidification, coral reef bleaching, threats to food and water security, and increasing frequency and severity of natural disasters.
Cook Islands, Federated State of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu,
Vanuatu
6
The provision of sufficient, additional and predictable financial resources for SIDS to implement climate change adaptation and mitigation projects and support national climate change priorities remains woefully inadequate and needs to be upgraded. Where funds exist, administrative procedures often preclude some SIDS from accessing them, and capacity building efforts have not effectively addressed this persistent problem.
The lack of ambition and urgency at the international level to reduce greenhouse gasses is also worrying for us. International action is not commensurate with the size or scale of the problem, and the need for urgent, decisive and ambitious action to ensure that the global average temperature increase remains below 1.5 degrees Celsius is critical to the survival of many SIDS.
Co-Chair,
Given the vulnerability of SIDS and their disadvantage with regard to traditional markets, trade policy is instrumental in developing and strengthening SIDS resilience. Capacity building for negotiating trade and partnership agreements, and navigating the complex requirements for accessing certain funds, would also benefit many SIDS.
We also urge the UN authorities such as UNCTAD to further develop ways and means to promote movement of SIDS goods, capital and professional services and preferential access to key markets with flexible rules of origin. The impact of Non-Tariff Measures (NTMs) and Non-Tariff Barriers (NTBs) on SIDS must also be effectively addressed.
We also call on the international community and financial institutions to exercise increased flexibility with respect to the Debt Sustainability Framework and the eligibility for debt relief; the provision of increased funds for debt rollover; innovative debt swap criteria; increased concessionalities; and to accelerate previous commitments regarding debt relief, taking into account the extreme vulnerability of small, indebted, middle-income countries whose size, fragile economies and open markets have made them highly susceptible to external financial shocks.
Expansion of concessionary financing to small, indebted, middle income countries to mitigate the significant sustainable development challenges that have been exacerbated by the ongoing crisis is needed, and access to such financing should be based on factors that go beyond GDP, which is by itself a poor indicator of economic sustainability.
Cook Islands, Federated State of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu,
Vanuatu
7
Co-Chair,
A dedicated technology transfer facilitation mechanism could be established by the international community to provide environmentally sound and appropriate technologies to developing countries, in particular SIDS, in keeping with the ongoing Rio+20 follow-up processes, in order to support sustainable development projects to be implemented through United Nations agencies, funds and programmes.
The modalities for supporting the projects might include multilateral, bilateral and triangular cooperation, with special consideration given to proposals from SIDS.
We also urge for support for and welcome investments in SIDS for the development of science, technology and innovation for sustainable development, with specific emphasis on research and development, in accordance with national interests and priorities.
Co-Chair,
PSIDS also require international and private sector support under the Secretary-General’s Sustainable Energy for All initiative, IRENA arrangements, and SIDS Dock and the Barbados Sustainable Energy Declaration to reduce dependence on carbon-based energy sources to renewal energy. Investment in green-growth policies and technology applications that is affordable and appropriate are also welcomed.
Finally, we note that challenges also remain for PSIDS in addressing non-communicable (NCDs), and communicable diseases, family planning, maternal, child and adolescent health; and improvement in health systems. We therefore encourage support and investment in the health sector as a strong foundation for a sustainable future for our people and nations.
I thank you.
Cook Islands, Federated State of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu,
Vanuatu