United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs Sustainable Development

Major Groups: NGOs, Women, Indigenous Peoples, Children and Youth

Proposed Goal 2: End hunger, achieve food security and adequate nutrition for all, and promote sustainable agriculture
Thank you Chair.
My name is Mayumi Sakoh and I speak on behalf of Major Groups NGOs, Women, Indigenous Peoples, Children and Youth, as well as the Food and Agriculture Cluster of the NGO Major Group.
Regarding proposed goal 2 we have the following general observations
- Many targets are action-oriented and transformative, we recommend maintaining the current level of ambition.
- In particular we very much welcome targets 2.1 to 2.7 and target 2.11.
On the title of the goal, we suggest to replace the word promote to shift, in line with the statement made by Benin on behalf of the LDCs.
On target 2.1. ending hunger by 2030, is clearly too late. The target year should be 2020. Furthermore, this target should refer to the realization of the right to food.
On target 2.4. access is not enough, this target should secure rights to land and other productive resources.
In addition, we suggest adding a target to halt and reverse landgrabbing.
On target 2.5. “develop” is too weak, we suggest this target should read “implement food systems etc.” We recall that the OWG11 wording of this target included reducing the intensity of use of chemicals, we propose to include wording on “eliminate use of highly hazardous pesticides”.
On target 2.7 we suggest to add a reference to post-production.
On target 2.8, we recommend referencing the concept of agro-ecological practices, which is an established and proven concept.
Target 2.11 is a key target to be retained. But we should not wait till 2030 to take action, thus change the date to 2020.
Regarding the means of implementation for Goal 2:
- On target 17.7, we would like to suggest amendments as to ensure fair trade, including making specific reference to agricultural export subsidies.
- We recommend to include target 2) of the G77 position and provide support for capacity building programmes and multi-stakeholder assessments in support of national plans for agriculture.
- Finally, we suggest to add a target to limit the usage of human-edible crops for animal feed.
The full statement will be made available on the website.
I thank you Co-Chairs.
Food and Agriculture Cluster 1/4 18 June 2014
Detailed Reaction to the Open Working Group 12 “Zero Draft” – June 2014 – Goal 2
Overall appreciation
 Many of the elements for action-oriented and transformational goals and targets are well covered in the “Zero Draft”. We recommend to maintain the current level of ambition in the goal and targets.
 We would encourage the following prioritization of targets: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, and 2.11; with 2.3 and 2.4, as well as 2.6 and 2.7 to be possibly merged.
 On the very few shortcomings, we suggest to strengthen the wording to allow for ambitious goals and targets (as outlined in the chart below).
Original text (Zero Draft of 2 June 2014)
Suggested changes
Rationales and comments
Proposed goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and adequate nutrition for all, and promote sustainable agriculture
Proposed goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and adequate nutrition for all, and shift to sustainable agriculture
 Transformational change in agriculture and food systems is urgently needed to address unprecedented environmental, social and economic challenges and to nourish a popu-lation of 9 billion people by 2050, contribute to environmental stewardship in the light of natural resource scarcity, social equity, as well as inclusive economic development.
2.1 end hunger and ensure that all people have access to adequate, safe, affordable, and nutritious food all year round by 2030
2.1 end hunger and ensure that all people have access to adequate, safe, affordable, nutritious, diverse and GMO-free food all year round by 2020, and achieve food sovereignty and the progressive realization of the right to food
 It is important to retain the word “diverse” from the FA document of the OWG 11. This target should be a high priority and thus, afforded a shorter timeline.
 Food and nutrition security encompass the availability of, access to and utilization of sufficient, healthy and culturally appropriate food for all, all year long and over time.
 Ending hunger and ensuring year-round access to adequate, safe, affordable and nutritious food is tightly linked to the right to food. Hence, specific reference to the human right to food should be made (Reference: Resolution “The right to food”, adopted by the General Assembly on 18 December 2013, A/RES/68/177)
2.2 end malnutrition in all its forms, including undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies and obesity and overweight, with special attention to reducing stunting by 40% and wasting to less than 5% in children less than 5 years of age by 2025, and address the nutritional needs of pregnant and lactating women
No changes. Supported as it is.
 All forms of malnutrition need to be tackled. The proposed target rightly captures the different dimensions of malnutrition.
2.3 by 2030, substantially increase small-scale food producers’ incomes and productivity, including small family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, with a particular focus on women
No changes. Supported as it is.
Food and Agriculture Cluster 2/4 18 June 2014
Original text (Zero Draft of 2 June 2014)
Suggested changes
Rationales and comments
2.4 by 2030 achieve access to adequate inputs, knowledge and productive resources, financial services and markets, especially for small and family farmers, pastoralists, and fishers, with a particular focus on women
2.4 by 2030 secure rights to land and other productive resources achieve access to adequate inputs, knowledge and productive resources, veterinary services, financial services, and markets across the rural-urban continuum, especially for small and family farmers, pastoralists, and fishers, with a particular focus on women and indigenous peoples
 The role of small-scale food producers, landless laborers and other rural communities is of particular importance as they are responsible for the majority of the agricultural production worldwide, and, at the same time, represent the majority of the world’s undernourished. Therefore, increasing the productivity of small-scale food producers, as opposed to the further intensification of industrial food production, represents the most efficient and sustainable route to achieving food security for all
 Adding veterinary services to enhance the ability of small-scale farmers and, in particular, pastoralists to increase their income and productivity (as per target 2.3).
 Urban rural linkages for food and economic security of both the urban and rural poor were recognized in the Future We Want and the rural urban nexus has been a recurrent issue in recent sessions of the OWG.
 Smallholder farmers, pastoralists and fisherfolk, both women and men, are recognized as economic actors guaranteeing their secure rights to land and aquatic resources, forests and other ecosystems. Indigenous peoples should be specifically called out to ensure their protection. Improved safe, reliable, affordable transport is a key enabler of rural access.
 It can be considered to merge targets 2.3 and 2.4.
2.5 by 2030, develop food systems that are more productive, sustainable, resilient and efficient, and minimize adverse human and environmental impacts without compromising food and nutrition security
2.5 by 2030, implement develop food systems that are more productive, sustainable, diverse, resilient and efficient, maintain and regenerate natural resources and ecosystems, and minimize adverse human and environmental impacts without compromising food and nutrition security, and eliminate use of highly hazardous pesticides, as well as reduce intensity of use of synthetic fertilizers.
 The current wording should be adjusted to reflect that the ability to produce enough and healthy food for present and future generations requires sustainable food systems that maintain natural resources and ecosystems.
 For the livestock sector, minimizing adverse human and environmental impacts can most efficiently be achieved through enhancing animal health and welfare.
 Sustainable food systems should reduce the intensity of the use of water, chemicals, and fossil-fuel based energy, as well as substitute all highly hazardous pesticides with safer, non-chemical alternatives. Unsustainable forms of agriculture and fisheries should be phased out through a combination of regulation, fiscal reform, and incentives
 It can be considered to merge with target 2.8.
2.6 by 2030 reduce by 50% global food waste at retail and consumer level, and
No changes. Supported as it is.
 Halving food losses and food waste is a critical target for post-2015. To ensure that both issues are being kept separate, the two topics can be assigned specific indicators, but merged in one target.
 It can be considered to merge targets 2.6 and 2.7.
2.7 by 2030 reduce by 50% production and post-harvest food losses and those along food supply chains
2.7 by 2030 reduce by 50% production and post-production, including post-harvest, food losses and those along food supply chains
 Reducing the global rate of food loss and waste is crucial to achieving proposed goal 2. In countries where food insecurity is most prevalent, preventing food loss during the production phase of the food supply chain is critical. We therefore strongly support the inclusion of target 2.7 in the Co-Chairs’ Zero draft and propose the suggested change to the target language to ensure that the non-crop agricultural sectors are included.
Food and Agriculture Cluster 3/4 18 June 2014
Original text (Zero Draft of 2 June 2014)
Suggested changes
Rationales and comments
2.8 by 2030, fully implement sustainable agricultural practices that strengthen resilience and adaptation to extreme weather, drought, climate change and natural disasters, in particular for small-scale farmers [merge with 2.5]
2.7 by 2030, fully implement agricultural and agro-ecological practices that strengthen resilience and adaptation to extreme weather, drought, climate change and natural disasters, in particular for small-scale farmers, women, pastoralists and fishers
 With regard to target 2.8 we propose the following language addition to ensure that the reach of this target is consistent with targets 2.3 and 2.4 and adequately reflects the broad scope of agriculture
 Given the critical role of small-scale farmers, strengthening their resilience and climate change adaptation capacity through sustainable agricultural practices will be key to achieving food and nutrition security.
 It can be considered to merge with target 2.5.
2.9 achieve by 2030 protection and sustainable use of agricultural biodiversity, including through enhanced use and application of indigenous practices and local and traditional knowledge, and through agricultural research and development related to agro-biodiversity and diversity of food
2.9 achieve by 2030 protection and sustainable use of agricultural biodiversity and forests, including through enhanced use and application of indigenous practices and local and traditional knowledge, and through agricultural research and development related to agro-biodiversity and diversity of food
 Agricultural biodiversity is critical to sustain long-term food production and hence must be maintained, safeguarded, and strengthened.
 As endorsed by the Convention on Biological Diversity, “agricultural biodiversity is a broad term that includes all components of biological diversity of relevance to food and agriculture, and all components of biological diversity that constitute the agro-ecosystem: the variety and variability of animals, plants and micro-organisms, at the genetic, species and ecosystem levels, which are necessary to sustain key functions of the agro-ecosystem, its structure and processes”1
 It can also be considered to retain agro-biodiversity under Goal 15.
2.10 improve effectiveness of addressing humanitarian food emergencies, including as appropriate through stockholding
No changes. Supported as it is.
 It could be considered to list this target in “means of implementation” section.
2.11 by 2030 fully implement measures that curb excessive food price volatility and ensure proper functioning of markets.
2.11 by 2020 fully implement measures that curb excessive food price volatility and ensure proper functioning of markets.
 2030 is far too long a timeline, curbing volatile food prices is one of the most urgent actions against poverty eradication.
 Excessive food price volatility can exacerbate poverty and hunger, and may even be a source of riots or intra-state conflicts. International action is needed to contain excessive food price volatility and enhance food security.2
Add new target after 2.4
concentration and misappropriation of land and their social and environmental negative impacts are halted is prevented and productive lands are redistributed
 This could be achieved through socially just and environmentally sound land reform programs to guarantee women’s human rights to land tenure, allowing collective ownership and governance over natural resources
1 COP decision V/5, appendix. http://www.cbd.int/decision/cop/default.shtml?id=7147
2 FAO (2012). Price Volatility from a Global Perspective. http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/templates/est/meetings/price_volatility/Pr… G20 Ministerial Declaration (2011). Action Plan on Food Price Volatility and Agriculture, G20 Agriculture Ministers. http://www.amis-outlook.org/fileadmin/user_upload/amis/docs/2011-agricu…
Food and Agriculture Cluster 4/4 18 June 2014
Original text (Zero Draft of 2 June 2014)
Suggested changes
Rationales and comments
Include target 15.6 under Proposed Goal 2
by 2030 restore an annual amount of degraded land equivalent to the annual amount of land degraded halt and prevent land degradation, reclaim land affected by desertification and drought, and improve land productivity and soil quality
 Addressing land and soil degradation issues also constitutes an important element in implementing sustainable agricultural and food practices, and in ensuring food security and nutrition. Target 15.6 should therefore be closely interlinked to proposed goal 2.
 With more than 1.9 billion hectares of land affected by land degradation due to unstainable use3, halting and preventing additional land degradation is an important step.
 We suggest rephrasing the target to acknowledge that certain degradation is unavoidable for development which implies the need for land restoration efforts. Moving the target to Proposed Goal 2 is needed to make the link between land and food security, for which land is a key underpinning resource
Include additional target under proposed goal 17 [Means of implementation], Proposed goal 2:
Group of 77 and China: Common Position on Means of Implementation for SDGs4
2) Enhance support to developing countries, especially LDCs and SIDS, in implementing capacity building programmes and assessments in support of national plans for agriculture
 Good governance at all levels is key to achieving sustainable development and reducing food insecurity, hunger and malnutrition. In this respect, country-initiated, multi-stakeholder assessments on food production and food security are instrumental in revealing the sustainability of food systems, including the enjoyment of the right to food. These assessments are a prerequisite for determining effective and foresighted agriculture, food security and nutrition strategies that accelerate progress towards national goals and targets. The Committee on World Food Security (CFS) is currently exploring options for how to facilitate country-initiated, multi-stakeholder assessments, based on the mandate outlined in the Rio+20 outcome document (para 115).
Include additional target under proposed goal 17 [Means of implementation], Proposed goal 2:
limit the usage of human-edible food crops for animal feed at x%
 The current failure to achieve universal food security can in part be accounted for by the lack of coordination and balance between animal-based and plant-based food production on a local, national and international scale.
 Limiting the usage of human-edible food crops for animal feed will enhance the availability of food; reduce the environmental impact of the agricultural sector; lower the price of basic food stuffs, particularly for the poorest and most food-insecure people; and reduce food price volatility.
3 Desertification, Land degradation and Drought (DLDD) – Some Global Facts & Figures (UNCCD). http://www.unccd.int/Lists/SiteDocumentLibrary/WDCD/DLDD%20Facts.pdf
4 http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/4209G77%20common…