United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs Sustainable Development

Major Groups: Indigenous Peoples

Indigenous
Peoples
Major
Group
Statement
3rd
UN
Conference
on
Small
Islands
Developing
States
3
Sept.
2014,
Morning
Plenary,
Apia,
Samoa
Presented
by
Mr.
Petero
Qaloibau,
Sisi
Initiative
Site
Support
Group,
Fiji
Mr.
Chair,
Excellencies,
distinguished
colleagues
On
behalf
of
the
Indigenous
Peoples
Major
Group,
I
thank
you
for
this
opportunity
to
share
our
views
in
this
historic
context.
We
thank
the
host
government,
the
organizers,
supporters,
and
especially
the
people
of
Samoa
for
the
incredible
hospitality
being
extended
to
all
the
visitors
of
this
beautiful
country.
As
Indigenous
Peoples,
including
Indigenous
persons
with
disabilities,
indigenous
women,
children
and
youth,
and
indigenous
older
persons,
we
recognize
our
relations
and
remain
honored
and
humbled
to
be
received
in
such
a
traditional
manner.
We
are
also
cautiously
encouraged
by
conference
theme
“genuine
and
durable
partnerships”
and
welcome
the
specific
reference
to
Indigenous
Peoples
in
paragraph
40
of
the
S.A.M.O.A.
Pathway
in
connection
to
climate
change;
however,
we
are
concerned
with
the
invisibility
of
Indigenous
Peoples
throughout
the
rest
of
the
document.
As
we
learned
with
the
MDG
process,
invisibility
does
not
promote
genuine
and
durable
partnerships.
The
S.A.M.O.A.
Pathway’s
lack
of
reference
to
Indigenous
Peoples
of
SIDS
is
inconsistent
with
the
intent
expressed
the
United
Nations
Declaration
on
the
Rights
of
Indigenous
Peoples
(UNDRIP).
Article
18,
for
example,
recognizes
our
right
to
“participate
in
decision-­‐making”
in
matters
which
would
affect
our
rights.
It
is
also
inconsistent
with
the
spirit
of
the
Rio
+
20
outcome
document,
The
Future
We
Want,
which
in
paragraph
49,
affirms
the
importance
of
the
UNDRIP
“in
the
context
of
global,
regional,
national
and
subnational
implementation
of
sustainable
development
strategies.”
While
we
understand
that
the
drafting
phase
of
the
S.A.M.O.A
pathway
is
closed,
we
note
the
document
was
technically
revised
on
August
26.
As
such,
we
recommend
an
additional
technical
revision
in
paragraph
80
to
maintain
consistency
with
the
UNDRIP,
Rio
+
20,
and
other
relevant
international
instruments.
The
technically
revised
paragraph
would
read:
80.
We
recognize
that
small
island
developing
States
possess
a
wealth
of
culture,
which
is
a
driver
and
an
enabler
for
sustainable
development.
In
particular,
the
traditional
knowledge
and
cultural
expression
of
Indigenous
Peoples
and
local
communities,
which
underscores
the
deep
connections
among
people,
culture,
knowledge
and
the
natural
environment,
can
meaningfully
advance
sustainable
development
and
social
cohesion.
Original
paragraph
reads:
80.
We
recognize
that
small
island
developing
States
possess
a
wealth
of
culture,
which
is
a
driver
and
an
enabler
for
sustainable
development.
In
particular,
indigenous
and
traditional
knowledge
and
cultural
expression,
which
underscores
the
deep
connections
among
people,
culture,
knowledge
and
the
natural
environment,
can
meaningfully
advance
sustainable
development
and
social
cohesion.
Likewise,
in
paragraph
81(c),
the
technically
revised
paragraph
should
read
“…involve
Indigenous
Peoples
and
local
communities
for
the
benefit
of
present
and
future
generations;”
Original
paragraph
reads:
81.
(c)
To
develop
and
strengthen
national
and
regional
cultural
activities
and
infrastructures,
including
through
the
network
of
World
Heritage
Sites,
which
reinforce
local
capacities,
promote
awareness
in
small
island
developing
States,
enhance
tangible
and
intangible
cultural
heritage,
including
local
and
indigenous
knowledge,
and
involve
local
people
for
the
benefit
of
present
and
future
generations;
Mr.
President,
beyond
these
technical
revisions,
Indigenous
Peoples
should
be
specifically
referenced
and
engaged
in
the
implementation
plan
of
the
S.A.M.O.A
Pathway,
as
well
as
in
local,
national,
and
international
implementation
of
the
post-­‐2015
Development
Agenda.
The
UNDRIP,
relevant
UN
Conventions,
Treaties,
and
other
constructive
agreements
should
inform
implementation
and
engagement
of
the
Indigenous
Peoples
of
SIDS.
In
closing,
genuine
and
durable
partnerships
with
Indigenous
Peoples
of
SIDS,
inclusive
and
consistent
with
our
rights,
should
be
seen
as
a
part
of
the
solution,
not
as
an
obstacle.
Finally,
the
Indigenous
Major
Group
expresses
our
support
for
the
statements
presented
by
the
Major
Groups
Forum
and
the
PAPAPAPAITAI
DECLARATION
issued
by
the
World
Network
of
Indigenous
and
Local
Community
Land
and
Sea
Managers
Pacific
Caucus
Delegates.
Thank
you.