United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs Sustainable Development

Major Group: Women

OWG
7
on
Sustainable
Development
Goals
On
Sustainable
Cities
and
Human
Settlements
January
6,
2014
Katia
Araujo,
Huairou
Commission
9:00-­‐
Daily
Session
of
MGs
and
Co-­‐Chairs
Good
Morning
Co-­‐Chairs.
Thank
you
for
the
floor.
I
am
please
to
be
representing
the
Huairou
Commission,
a
global
coalition
of
grassroots
women's
groups
and
facilitating
NGOs
working
in
50
countries
to
eradicate
poverty
through
gender
justice
approaches.
In
this
session,
I
am
honored
to
speak
on
behalf
of
the
Women's
Major
Group.
To
realize
sustainable
development
and
collective
effort
to
protect
the
environment.,
I
would
like
to
emphasize
that
the
new
development
framework
must
be
grounded
in
human
rights;
must
reflect
a
commitment
to
non-­‐discrimination
across
its
themes;
and
must
surface
experiences
of
people
in
marginalized
groups
across
goals,
target
and
indicators.
The
specific
aspects
of
sustainable
development
goals
must
constitute
2
key
areas:
1.
Participatory,
inclusive
actions
at
the
local
level
that
can
promote
and
improve
gender
equality
and
ensure
exercise
of
women’s
rights
within
a
sustainable
development
frame
that
benefits
all.
2.
A
gendered
and
people-­‐centered
approach
must
be
cross
cutting
and
institutionalized
at
all
levels.
On
the
theme
of
Sustainable
Cities,
we
consider
inclusive
cities-­‐-­‐be
they
large
urban
megacities,
peri-­‐urban
or
smaller
rural
townships-­‐-­‐will
only
grow
if
organized
groups
of
poor
women
are
consciously
and
formally
incorporated
in
the
full
range
of
public
decision
making
associated
with
planning
and
strengthening
infrastructure,
basic
services
and
fostering
equitable
economic
growth
in
large,
mid
and
small
size
communities
and
towns.
In
the
next
twenty
years,
the
desirable
outcomes
depend
upon
accelerating
participatory,
transparent
and
accountable
decentralized
local
governance:
where
elected
local
authorities,
public
officials,
and
local
citizen
groups
collectively
set
priorities
for
city
and
township
planning
and
development
projects
and
insure
that
budgets
and
contracts
are
properly
determined
and
managed
to
achieve
the
desired
results.
These
steps
require
new
forms
of
power
sharing
between
national
and
local
governments
and
public
accountability
mechanisms
that
mandate
and
monitor
the
active
participation
of
local
community
groups
and
insure
that
the
poorest
residents
and
settlements
are
as
actively
included
as
the
middle
and
wealthiest
ones.
Settlement
focused
policy
and
programming
goals
must
be
framed
in
a
manner
that
recognizes
and
fosters
collaborative
public
partnerships
with
existing,
women-­‐led
self
help
organizations
operating
in
significant
numbers
in
rural,
peri-­‐urban
and
large
urban
areas
across
cities.
In
my
experience
at
Huairou
Commission
I
work
with
federated
women’s
groups
and
networks
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A
SDGs
framework
for
promoting
sustainable
cities
and
towns
must
ensure:
The
element
of
empowerment
as
it
exists
on
many
different
levels
from
the
household
to
neighborhood,
village,
citywide,
regionally,
nationally,
and
internationally.
For
each
type
of
power
and
outcome,
women
need
an
infrastructure
of
support
that
ties
individual
lives
to
the
greater
conditions
of
urban
areas.
A
new
development
framework
requires
the
creation
of
concrete
mechanisms
through
which
multiple
stakeholders
collaborate
with
organized
groups
of
women
living
in
poor
communities
to
redistribute
opportunities,
resources
and
roles
with
a
view
to
redressing
power
imbalances
that
are
at
the
heart
of
poverty
and
inequality.
There
is
a
need
to
educate
citizens
about
existing
policies
and
programs
to
enable
their
active
participation
in
city
governance
and
to
bring
best
practices
into
policies.
Education
about
roles
and
responsibilities
in
taking
ownership
of
the
city
as
a
whole
and
specifically
the
neighborhood
will
promote
the
concept
of
city
sustainability.
The
time
to
act
is
now.
The
challenge
before
us
is
to
not
only
to
improve
living
conditions
of
poor
communities
and
that
of
women
living
in
these
communities,
by
delivering
resources
and
services
to
them
more
effectively,
but
to
transform
women’s
status
by
changing
the
way
in
which
they
are
perceived
by
their
families,
communities
and
governments;
and
by
enabling
them
to
claim
their
rightful
place
as
citizens,
change-­‐agents,
leaders
and
stakeholders
in
development.
Develop
a
goal
for
sustainable
cities
and
integrate
multiple
gender-­‐related
targets
that
promote
respect
for
and
exercise
of
human
rights.
-­‐Macroeconomic
and
fiscal
policies
to
increase
equity
and
redistribution
of
wealth
via
progressive
tax
reforms,
social
protection
are
implemented
(national
to
local)
that
facilitate
robust
decentralized
decision
making
and
public
finance
systems
that
catalyze
sustainable,
inclusive
cities
Within
a
democratic
decentralization
process,
national
and
local
governments
have
strong
incentives
to
engage
and
collaborate
with
grassroots
women’s
organizations
and
other
marginalized
groups
and
other
marginalized
groups
to
jointly
plan,
initiate
and
scale
up
development
solutions
that
tangibly
improve
the
quality
of
life
of
the
poor,
especially
women
in
poor
communities.
City
planning,
budgeting
and
local
development
processes
are
required
to
formally
appoint
representatives
of
grassroots
women’s
organizations
to
play
formal
public
roles
in
prioritizing,
delivering
and
monitoring
local
development
programs
and
financial
resources
are
earmarked
for
these
representatives
to
undertake
these
roles.
Generate
and
incentivize
decent
work
locally

with
living
wages,
benefits,
accessible
in
terms
of
place,
schedule,
requirements.
Focusing
on
the
promotion
of
green
growth
or
green
economy
activities
will
not
automatically
translate
into
decent
jobs,
respect
for
human
rights
or
poverty
eradication.
Pro-­‐poor,
gender
just
settlement
and
city
development
can
be
measured
by:
Improved
collection
of
data
disaggregated
by
sex,
age,
(among
others),
taking
into
account
the
different
groups
in
cities.
Capacity
of
city/municipal
governments
is
built
and
national
programs
require
collection
according
to
internationally
determined
standards
that
allow
for
comparison
across
countries
(encourage
time
use
and
household
surveys
to
capture
the
intra-­‐city
diversity)
The
increasing
formal
inclusion,
legitimation,
and
support
for
community-­‐collected
data
on
nature
and
scale
of
poverty
and
informality
in
communities,
townships
and
cities,
especially
by
municipal
authorities.
a)
Percentage
of
women
and
men,
indigenous
peoples
and
local
communities
with
legal
recognized
evidence
of
tenure
The
increasing
amount
of
housing
and
land
that
poor
women
and
communities
control
and
have
secure
tenure
over
as
the
result
of
participatory,
transparent
public
decision-­‐making
processes
The
expansion
of
essential
basic
services
(water,
electricity,
sanitation)
and
public
spaces
and
centers
(gardens,
parks,
recreation,
community
meeting
halls)
that
are
equitably
managed
and
used
by
community
men
and
women
The
existence
and
application
of
principles
and
safeguards
to
ensure
participation
and
the
equitable
distribution
of
resources
and
opportunities
in:
a)
local
economic
development,
housing,
infrastructure
and
transportation
planning
and
projects
and
b)
decentralized
public
health
and
family
support
initiatives
(clinics,
childcare,
etc.)
Local
development
projects
and
capacity
building
programs
draw
upon
and
fund
the
,
knowledge,
skills
and
local
expertise
of
grassroots
women's
organizations
and
communities
and
facilitate
the
transfer
of
community
women’s
effective
sustainable
development
practices
across
neighborhoods,
cities,
and
regions.
We
recommend
a
sustainable
development
goals
framework
that
is
demand
driven
and
promote
sustainable
communities
and
human
settlements
that
encompasses
a
range
of
practical
and
strategies
which
will
determine
how
women’s
empowerment
and
gender-­‐ just
economic,
social
and
political
opportunities
will
be
accelerated
in
the
next
decades.