United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs Sustainable Development

Major Group: Indigenous Peoples

Interactive Dialogue with stakeholders from the post-2015 process (Major
Groups and other Stakeholders) and Financing for Development process
(civil society and business sector)
Thursday, 23 April 2015, 10:00am - 1:00 pm
Statement by the Indigenous Major Group
Delivered by Myrna Cunningham, Centre for the Autonomous Development
of Indigenous Peoples (CADPI)
Theme: Technology facilitation mechanism, and other science, technology
and innovation issues
Q: How can science, technology, and innovation, including a possible technology
facilitation mechanism, support the implementation of the post-2015 development
agenda, including the SDGs?
Esteemed Co-chairs, Excellencies, Major Groups and other Stakeholders,
On behalf of the Indigenous Peoples Major Group, I thank you for the opportunity
to share some perspectives on how science, technology, and innovation,
including a possible technology facilitation mechanism, can support the
implementation of the post-2015 development agenda, including the SDGs.
From an indigenous perspective, it is important to enter into this dialogue
acknowledging the historic and ongoing injustices committed against our peoples
around the world under guise of these three (3) main themes. Moving forward,
particularly with a view toward a technology facilitation mechanism, the human
rights based approach is key to moving from barriers to enablers.
For indigenous peoples, SDG and Post-2015 Development Agenda
implementation can only be facilitated by increasing our visibility and
opportunities for effective participation within all phases of these processes, as
well as recognizing and implementing our rights, including free, prior, and
informed consent. Effective participation must include monitoring and
assessment of potential impacts.
Co-Chair(s), we must also be clear that all technology is not owned by the private
sector and indigenous innovations, informal technology transfers, and
adaptations strategies should not only be recognized, but developed, supported,
and scaled. The vital role of traditional knowledge needs to be recognized,
respected, and protected. Appropriate safeguards for access and benefit sharing
must also be a part of the discussion.
Access to technologies, for example, should take into consideration the gender
dimension and national, regional, and global platforms for technology transfer
should be established and facilitated in partnership with indigenous governance
structures and value systems.
As 80% of the worlds remaining biodiversity is found indigenous territories,
technology transfer need to be locally appropriate, environmentally safe,
sustainable, economically equitable, and proven. Regulatory frameworks for
hazardous technologies must also be strengthened and strictly enforced. Finally,
discussions concerning the establishment of the Technology Bank for LDCs must
include the participation of Indigenous Peoples and give equitable attention to
traditional technologies and knowledge systems.
In closing, for Indigenous Peoples the way forward is clear, science, technology,
and innovation can support the implementation of the SDGs and the post-2015
development agenda if our rights our respected and there is political will to
implement the commitments states have already made to the World’s Indigenous
Peoples.
Thank you