United NationsДепартамент по экономическим и социальным вопросам Sustainable Development

Major Group: Farmers

In many developing countries, sustainable practices are difficult to
implement due to the lack of financial resources, infrastructure and
services. This represents a major constraint on the competitiveness and
viability of the agricultural sector.
If handled correctly, transportation offers a number of win-win opportunities
for employment, poverty reduction, and reduced environmental impact.
Infrastructure investment is needed ? particularly in rural roads ? to make
supplies available to farmers, workers and industry and then to provide
easy access to markets. A corridors approach, such as the efforts in Africa
to build from ports inward to the countryside should be a priority.
A priority for development expenditure must also be focused on on-farm
storage and processing facilities that reduce post-harvest losses.
Reducing production losses and food waste are key elements for
sustainable development. Some estimates of post harvest losses are as
high as 40%.
Farmers need to have adequate and appropriate transportation
infrastructure, local storage facilities including cold chain storage for food
preservation to reduce losses.
Finally, the issue of biofuels has been raised several times. Farmers need
assistance with the right technology for the production of biofuels on their
farms. That can include alternate crops and use of biomass which is
currently a waste product. We want to contribute to cleaner fuels without
damaging national and global food security.
Workers and Trade Unions Joint Statement with Farmers? Major
Group
Statement on Transportation Roundtable
CSD-18, May 13, 2010
Mister Chairman,
On behalf of Workers and Trade Unions, as well as the Farmers? Major
Group, we provide a joint statement on transportation.
Both groups share an interest in questions related to access. Whether it is
a farmer isolated in a rural area unable to sell her crops to a market, or a
worker in a burgeoning city forced to commute for hours to his job; limited
access to transportation diminishes livelihoods and quality of life.
Our priorities relate to improving the ability of people to use transportation
for the valuable social development role it plays. We call for:
1) Ensuring public transport systems are adequate, efficient and
affordable, and help workers reaching their jobs, education and
markets. A shift from individual to collective transportation systems
must be a pillar.
2) Investing in and building infrastructure ? particularly roads and ports ?
to make supplies available to farmers, workers, and others and to
provide access markets. We encourage use of a corridors approach,
such as the efforts in Africa to build from ports inward to the
countryside. The most environmentally-friendly options must be
prioritized.
3) Building transportation and storage facilities in developing regions to
reduce post harvest losses and food waste.
4) Promote the improvement of working conditions of transport workers
as a means for reducing health risks and increasing environmental
protection. Pressing issues such as HIV and safety conditions need
attention.
If handled correctly, transportation offers a number of win-win opportunities
for employment, poverty reduction, and reduced environmental impact.
Public works spur employment, and road maintenance provides ongoing
jobs. Public transportation reduces the footprint of transportation and more
efficient solutions such as rail development & inter-modality can improve
the movement of goods and commodities.
At the same time, Mister Chairman, both our groups are cognizant of the
impact unsustainable patterns of transportation have on health, pollution,
climate change and poverty. We encourage the use of sound science and
engineering to reduce emissions and create systems that move people and
products as efficiently as possible.
Thank you Mr. Chairman.