United NationsДепартамент по экономическим и социальным вопросам Sustainable Development

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

High-level Political Forum
Making the 2030 Agenda deliver for SIDS, building on the SAMOA Pathway
Remarks by the Director of the FAO Liaison Office to the UN, Ms. Carla Mucavi
14 July, 11:30-1pm, Trusteeship Chamber, UN, New York
1. Thank you for giving me the floor.
2. FAO recognises the sustainable development challenges faced by SIDS and is actively
supporting them in reaching the goals set by the 2030 Agenda, in-line with the ambitious
commitments outlined in the SAMOA pathway.
3. As has been said before, delivering the SAMOA Pathway and the 2030 Agenda is one and
the same effort for SIDS. In these countries, the connections between the Sustainable
Development Goals become even clearer, as well as the need to address them
simultaneously.
4. Food security and nutrition, agriculture and fisheries production, the protection of
biodiversity and responses to climate change must and can be brought together to achieve
the promises of the 2030 agenda for people, the planet, and prosperity.
5. It is in this spirit that we are approaching the task given to FAO in paragraph 61 of the
SAMOA Pathway, to facilitate the development of an action program for food security and
nutrition in SIDS. And that we are supporting the UN Conference on Oceans, to be coorganized
by Fiji and Sweden in July 2017.
6. Looking at our challenges from an SDG-14 angle, ensuring healthy oceans is essential for
adequate food security and nutrition in SIDS.
7. I would also like to emphasize that healthy and nutritious diets sourced from the oceans are
necessary to combat the rise of non-communicable diseases in SIDS, and reduce the
economic burden on health systems, those caused by loss of productivity, and food
imports.
8. An example of how to articulate efforts to promote sustainable environmental, economic
and social development is FAO’s ‘Blue Growth Initiative’, which seeks to harness the
potential of oceans, seas and coasts and their resources in a productive, sustainable and
inclusive manner.
9. Finally, while SIDS are blameless to the cause of climate change, we recognise they are
bearing its greatest cost. In order to achieve sustainable development in SIDS we need to
act on our shared responsibility in implementing the 2030 Agenda with global, regional and
local responses to support SIDS, who in some cases have their very existence threatened.
10.Thank you for your attention.
High-level Political Forum
Making the 2030 Agenda deliver for SIDS, building on the SAMOA Pathway
Remarks by the Director of the FAO Liaison Office to the UN, Ms. Carla Mucavi
14 July, 11:30-1pm, Trusteeship Chamber, UN, New York
1. Thank you for giving me the floor.
2. FAO recognises the sustainable development challenges faced by SIDS and is actively
supporting them in reaching the goals set by the 2030 Agenda, in-line with the ambitious
commitments outlined in the SAMOA pathway.
3. As has been said before, delivering the SAMOA Pathway and the 2030 Agenda is one and
the same effort for SIDS. In these countries, the connections between the Sustainable
Development Goals become even clearer, as well as the need to address them
simultaneously.
4. Food security and nutrition, agriculture and fisheries production, the protection of
biodiversity and responses to climate change must and can be brought together to achieve
the promises of the 2030 agenda for people, the planet, and prosperity.
5. It is in this spirit that we are approaching the task given to FAO in paragraph 61 of the
SAMOA Pathway, to facilitate the development of an action program for food security and
nutrition in SIDS. And that we are supporting the UN Conference on Oceans, to be coorganized
by Fiji and Sweden in July 2017.
6. Looking at our challenges from an SDG-14 angle, ensuring healthy oceans is essential for
adequate food security and nutrition in SIDS.
7. I would also like to emphasize that healthy and nutritious diets sourced from the oceans are
necessary to combat the rise of non-communicable diseases in SIDS, and reduce the
economic burden on health systems, those caused by loss of productivity, and food
imports.
8. An example of how to articulate efforts to promote sustainable environmental, economic
and social development is FAO’s ‘Blue Growth Initiative’, which seeks to harness the
potential of oceans, seas and coasts and their resources in a productive, sustainable and
inclusive manner.
9. Finally, while SIDS are blameless to the cause of climate change, we recognise they are
bearing its greatest cost. In order to achieve sustainable development in SIDS we need to
act on our shared responsibility in implementing the 2030 Agenda with global, regional and
local responses to support SIDS, who in some cases have their very existence threatened.
10.Thank you for your attention.
High-level Political Forum
Making the 2030 Agenda deliver for SIDS, building on the SAMOA Pathway
Remarks by the Director of the FAO Liaison Office to the UN, Ms. Carla Mucavi
14 July, 11:30-1pm, Trusteeship Chamber, UN, New York
1. Thank you for giving me the floor.
2. FAO recognises the sustainable development challenges faced by SIDS and is actively
supporting them in reaching the goals set by the 2030 Agenda, in-line with the ambitious
commitments outlined in the SAMOA pathway.
3. As has been said before, delivering the SAMOA Pathway and the 2030 Agenda is one and
the same effort for SIDS. In these countries, the connections between the Sustainable
Development Goals become even clearer, as well as the need to address them
simultaneously.
4. Food security and nutrition, agriculture and fisheries production, the protection of
biodiversity and responses to climate change must and can be brought together to achieve
the promises of the 2030 agenda for people, the planet, and prosperity.
5. It is in this spirit that we are approaching the task given to FAO in paragraph 61 of the
SAMOA Pathway, to facilitate the development of an action program for food security and
nutrition in SIDS. And that we are supporting the UN Conference on Oceans, to be coorganized
by Fiji and Sweden in July 2017.
6. Looking at our challenges from an SDG-14 angle, ensuring healthy oceans is essential for
adequate food security and nutrition in SIDS.
7. I would also like to emphasize that healthy and nutritious diets sourced from the oceans are
necessary to combat the rise of non-communicable diseases in SIDS, and reduce the
economic burden on health systems, those caused by loss of productivity, and food
imports.
8. An example of how to articulate efforts to promote sustainable environmental, economic
and social development is FAO’s ‘Blue Growth Initiative’, which seeks to harness the
potential of oceans, seas and coasts and their resources in a productive, sustainable and
inclusive manner.
9. Finally, while SIDS are blameless to the cause of climate change, we recognise they are
bearing its greatest cost. In order to achieve sustainable development in SIDS we need to
act on our shared responsibility in implementing the 2030 Agenda with global, regional and
local responses to support SIDS, who in some cases have their very existence threatened.
10.Thank you for your attention.
High-level Political Forum
Making the 2030 Agenda deliver for SIDS, building on the SAMOA Pathway
Remarks by the Director of the FAO Liaison Office to the UN, Ms. Carla Mucavi
14 July, 11:30-1pm, Trusteeship Chamber, UN, New York
1. Thank you for giving me the floor.
2. FAO recognises the sustainable development challenges faced by SIDS and is actively
supporting them in reaching the goals set by the 2030 Agenda, in-line with the ambitious
commitments outlined in the SAMOA pathway.
3. As has been said before, delivering the SAMOA Pathway and the 2030 Agenda is one and
the same effort for SIDS. In these countries, the connections between the Sustainable
Development Goals become even clearer, as well as the need to address them
simultaneously.
4. Food security and nutrition, agriculture and fisheries production, the protection of
biodiversity and responses to climate change must and can be brought together to achieve
the promises of the 2030 agenda for people, the planet, and prosperity.
5. It is in this spirit that we are approaching the task given to FAO in paragraph 61 of the
SAMOA Pathway, to facilitate the development of an action program for food security and
nutrition in SIDS. And that we are supporting the UN Conference on Oceans, to be coorganized
by Fiji and Sweden in July 2017.
6. Looking at our challenges from an SDG-14 angle, ensuring healthy oceans is essential for
adequate food security and nutrition in SIDS.
7. I would also like to emphasize that healthy and nutritious diets sourced from the oceans are
necessary to combat the rise of non-communicable diseases in SIDS, and reduce the
economic burden on health systems, those caused by loss of productivity, and food
imports.
8. An example of how to articulate efforts to promote sustainable environmental, economic
and social development is FAO’s ‘Blue Growth Initiative’, which seeks to harness the
potential of oceans, seas and coasts and their resources in a productive, sustainable and
inclusive manner.
9. Finally, while SIDS are blameless to the cause of climate change, we recognise they are
bearing its greatest cost. In order to achieve sustainable development in SIDS we need to
act on our shared responsibility in implementing the 2030 Agenda with global, regional and
local responses to support SIDS, who in some cases have their very existence threatened.
10.Thank you for your attention.
High-level Political Forum
Making the 2030 Agenda deliver for SIDS, building on the SAMOA Pathway
Remarks by the Director of the FAO Liaison Office to the UN, Ms. Carla Mucavi
14 July, 11:30-1pm, Trusteeship Chamber, UN, New York
1. Thank you for giving me the floor.
2. FAO recognises the sustainable development challenges faced by SIDS and is actively
supporting them in reaching the goals set by the 2030 Agenda, in-line with the ambitious
commitments outlined in the SAMOA pathway.
3. As has been said before, delivering the SAMOA Pathway and the 2030 Agenda is one and
the same effort for SIDS. In these countries, the connections between the Sustainable
Development Goals become even clearer, as well as the need to address them
simultaneously.
4. Food security and nutrition, agriculture and fisheries production, the protection of
biodiversity and responses to climate change must and can be brought together to achieve
the promises of the 2030 agenda for people, the planet, and prosperity.
5. It is in this spirit that we are approaching the task given to FAO in paragraph 61 of the
SAMOA Pathway, to facilitate the development of an action program for food security and
nutrition in SIDS. And that we are supporting the UN Conference on Oceans, to be coorganized
by Fiji and Sweden in July 2017.
6. Looking at our challenges from an SDG-14 angle, ensuring healthy oceans is essential for
adequate food security and nutrition in SIDS.
7. I would also like to emphasize that healthy and nutritious diets sourced from the oceans are
necessary to combat the rise of non-communicable diseases in SIDS, and reduce the
economic burden on health systems, those caused by loss of productivity, and food
imports.
8. An example of how to articulate efforts to promote sustainable environmental, economic
and social development is FAO’s ‘Blue Growth Initiative’, which seeks to harness the
potential of oceans, seas and coasts and their resources in a productive, sustainable and
inclusive manner.
9. Finally, while SIDS are blameless to the cause of climate change, we recognise they are
bearing its greatest cost. In order to achieve sustainable development in SIDS we need to
act on our shared responsibility in implementing the 2030 Agenda with global, regional and
local responses to support SIDS, who in some cases have their very existence threatened.
10.Thank you for your attention.
High-level Political Forum
Making the 2030 Agenda deliver for SIDS, building on the SAMOA Pathway
Remarks by the Director of the FAO Liaison Office to the UN, Ms. Carla Mucavi
14 July, 11:30-1pm, Trusteeship Chamber, UN, New York
1. Thank you for giving me the floor.
2. FAO recognises the sustainable development challenges faced by SIDS and is actively
supporting them in reaching the goals set by the 2030 Agenda, in-line with the ambitious
commitments outlined in the SAMOA pathway.
3. As has been said before, delivering the SAMOA Pathway and the 2030 Agenda is one and
the same effort for SIDS. In these countries, the connections between the Sustainable
Development Goals become even clearer, as well as the need to address them
simultaneously.
4. Food security and nutrition, agriculture and fisheries production, the protection of
biodiversity and responses to climate change must and can be brought together to achieve
the promises of the 2030 agenda for people, the planet, and prosperity.
5. It is in this spirit that we are approaching the task given to FAO in paragraph 61 of the
SAMOA Pathway, to facilitate the development of an action program for food security and
nutrition in SIDS. And that we are supporting the UN Conference on Oceans, to be coorganized
by Fiji and Sweden in July 2017.
6. Looking at our challenges from an SDG-14 angle, ensuring healthy oceans is essential for
adequate food security and nutrition in SIDS.
7. I would also like to emphasize that healthy and nutritious diets sourced from the oceans are
necessary to combat the rise of non-communicable diseases in SIDS, and reduce the
economic burden on health systems, those caused by loss of productivity, and food
imports.
8. An example of how to articulate efforts to promote sustainable environmental, economic
and social development is FAO’s ‘Blue Growth Initiative’, which seeks to harness the
potential of oceans, seas and coasts and their resources in a productive, sustainable and
inclusive manner.
9. Finally, while SIDS are blameless to the cause of climate change, we recognise they are
bearing its greatest cost. In order to achieve sustainable development in SIDS we need to
act on our shared responsibility in implementing the 2030 Agenda with global, regional and
local responses to support SIDS, who in some cases have their very existence threatened.
10.Thank you for your attention.
High-level Political Forum
Making the 2030 Agenda deliver for SIDS, building on the SAMOA Pathway
Remarks by the Director of the FAO Liaison Office to the UN, Ms. Carla Mucavi
14 July, 11:30-1pm, Trusteeship Chamber, UN, New York
1. Thank you for giving me the floor.
2. FAO recognises the sustainable development challenges faced by SIDS and is actively
supporting them in reaching the goals set by the 2030 Agenda, in-line with the ambitious
commitments outlined in the SAMOA pathway.
3. As has been said before, delivering the SAMOA Pathway and the 2030 Agenda is one and
the same effort for SIDS. In these countries, the connections between the Sustainable
Development Goals become even clearer, as well as the need to address them
simultaneously.
4. Food security and nutrition, agriculture and fisheries production, the protection of
biodiversity and responses to climate change must and can be brought together to achieve
the promises of the 2030 agenda for people, the planet, and prosperity.
5. It is in this spirit that we are approaching the task given to FAO in paragraph 61 of the
SAMOA Pathway, to facilitate the development of an action program for food security and
nutrition in SIDS. And that we are supporting the UN Conference on Oceans, to be coorganized
by Fiji and Sweden in July 2017.
6. Looking at our challenges from an SDG-14 angle, ensuring healthy oceans is essential for
adequate food security and nutrition in SIDS.
7. I would also like to emphasize that healthy and nutritious diets sourced from the oceans are
necessary to combat the rise of non-communicable diseases in SIDS, and reduce the
economic burden on health systems, those caused by loss of productivity, and food
imports.
8. An example of how to articulate efforts to promote sustainable environmental, economic
and social development is FAO’s ‘Blue Growth Initiative’, which seeks to harness the
potential of oceans, seas and coasts and their resources in a productive, sustainable and
inclusive manner.
9. Finally, while SIDS are blameless to the cause of climate change, we recognise they are
bearing its greatest cost. In order to achieve sustainable development in SIDS we need to
act on our shared responsibility in implementing the 2030 Agenda with global, regional and
local responses to support SIDS, who in some cases have their very existence threatened.
10.Thank you for your attention.
High-level Political Forum
Making the 2030 Agenda deliver for SIDS, building on the SAMOA Pathway
Remarks by the Director of the FAO Liaison Office to the UN, Ms. Carla Mucavi
14 July, 11:30-1pm, Trusteeship Chamber, UN, New York
1. Thank you for giving me the floor.
2. FAO recognises the sustainable development challenges faced by SIDS and is actively
supporting them in reaching the goals set by the 2030 Agenda, in-line with the ambitious
commitments outlined in the SAMOA pathway.
3. As has been said before, delivering the SAMOA Pathway and the 2030 Agenda is one and
the same effort for SIDS. In these countries, the connections between the Sustainable
Development Goals become even clearer, as well as the need to address them
simultaneously.
4. Food security and nutrition, agriculture and fisheries production, the protection of
biodiversity and responses to climate change must and can be brought together to achieve
the promises of the 2030 agenda for people, the planet, and prosperity.
5. It is in this spirit that we are approaching the task given to FAO in paragraph 61 of the
SAMOA Pathway, to facilitate the development of an action program for food security and
nutrition in SIDS. And that we are supporting the UN Conference on Oceans, to be coorganized
by Fiji and Sweden in July 2017.
6. Looking at our challenges from an SDG-14 angle, ensuring healthy oceans is essential for
adequate food security and nutrition in SIDS.
7. I would also like to emphasize that healthy and nutritious diets sourced from the oceans are
necessary to combat the rise of non-communicable diseases in SIDS, and reduce the
economic burden on health systems, those caused by loss of productivity, and food
imports.
8. An example of how to articulate efforts to promote sustainable environmental, economic
and social development is FAO’s ‘Blue Growth Initiative’, which seeks to harness the
potential of oceans, seas and coasts and their resources in a productive, sustainable and
inclusive manner.
9. Finally, while SIDS are blameless to the cause of climate change, we recognise they are
bearing its greatest cost. In order to achieve sustainable development in SIDS we need to
act on our shared responsibility in implementing the 2030 Agenda with global, regional and
local responses to support SIDS, who in some cases have their very existence threatened.
10.Thank you for your attention.
High-level Political Forum
Making the 2030 Agenda deliver for SIDS, building on the SAMOA Pathway
Remarks by the Director of the FAO Liaison Office to the UN, Ms. Carla Mucavi
14 July, 11:30-1pm, Trusteeship Chamber, UN, New York
1. Thank you for giving me the floor.
2. FAO recognises the sustainable development challenges faced by SIDS and is actively
supporting them in reaching the goals set by the 2030 Agenda, in-line with the ambitious
commitments outlined in the SAMOA pathway.
3. As has been said before, delivering the SAMOA Pathway and the 2030 Agenda is one and
the same effort for SIDS. In these countries, the connections between the Sustainable
Development Goals become even clearer, as well as the need to address them
simultaneously.
4. Food security and nutrition, agriculture and fisheries production, the protection of
biodiversity and responses to climate change must and can be brought together to achieve
the promises of the 2030 agenda for people, the planet, and prosperity.
5. It is in this spirit that we are approaching the task given to FAO in paragraph 61 of the
SAMOA Pathway, to facilitate the development of an action program for food security and
nutrition in SIDS. And that we are supporting the UN Conference on Oceans, to be coorganized
by Fiji and Sweden in July 2017.
6. Looking at our challenges from an SDG-14 angle, ensuring healthy oceans is essential for
adequate food security and nutrition in SIDS.
7. I would also like to emphasize that healthy and nutritious diets sourced from the oceans are
necessary to combat the rise of non-communicable diseases in SIDS, and reduce the
economic burden on health systems, those caused by loss of productivity, and food
imports.
8. An example of how to articulate efforts to promote sustainable environmental, economic
and social development is FAO’s ‘Blue Growth Initiative’, which seeks to harness the
potential of oceans, seas and coasts and their resources in a productive, sustainable and
inclusive manner.
9. Finally, while SIDS are blameless to the cause of climate change, we recognise they are
bearing its greatest cost. In order to achieve sustainable development in SIDS we need to
act on our shared responsibility in implementing the 2030 Agenda with global, regional and
local responses to support SIDS, who in some cases have their very existence threatened.
10.Thank you for your attention.
High-level Political Forum
Making the 2030 Agenda deliver for SIDS, building on the SAMOA Pathway
Remarks by the Director of the FAO Liaison Office to the UN, Ms. Carla Mucavi
14 July, 11:30-1pm, Trusteeship Chamber, UN, New York
1. Thank you for giving me the floor.
2. FAO recognises the sustainable development challenges faced by SIDS and is actively
supporting them in reaching the goals set by the 2030 Agenda, in-line with the ambitious
commitments outlined in the SAMOA pathway.
3. As has been said before, delivering the SAMOA Pathway and the 2030 Agenda is one and
the same effort for SIDS. In these countries, the connections between the Sustainable
Development Goals become even clearer, as well as the need to address them
simultaneously.
4. Food security and nutrition, agriculture and fisheries production, the protection of
biodiversity and responses to climate change must and can be brought together to achieve
the promises of the 2030 agenda for people, the planet, and prosperity.
5. It is in this spirit that we are approaching the task given to FAO in paragraph 61 of the
SAMOA Pathway, to facilitate the development of an action program for food security and
nutrition in SIDS. And that we are supporting the UN Conference on Oceans, to be coorganized
by Fiji and Sweden in July 2017.
6. Looking at our challenges from an SDG-14 angle, ensuring healthy oceans is essential for
adequate food security and nutrition in SIDS.
7. I would also like to emphasize that healthy and nutritious diets sourced from the oceans are
necessary to combat the rise of non-communicable diseases in SIDS, and reduce the
economic burden on health systems, those caused by loss of productivity, and food
imports.
8. An example of how to articulate efforts to promote sustainable environmental, economic
and social development is FAO’s ‘Blue Growth Initiative’, which seeks to harness the
potential of oceans, seas and coasts and their resources in a productive, sustainable and
inclusive manner.
9. Finally, while SIDS are blameless to the cause of climate change, we recognise they are
bearing its greatest cost. In order to achieve sustainable development in SIDS we need to
act on our shared responsibility in implementing the 2030 Agenda with global, regional and
local responses to support SIDS, who in some cases have their very existence threatened.
10.Thank you for your attention.